Thursday, September 6, 2007

THE BASIC SCHOOL CLASS 4-69

THE BASIC SCHOOL

CLASS 4-69
UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS
Qauntico, VA
October 1968-March 1969

LATEST NEWS

The 45th reunion was held in San Diego in September 2013.  It was a great success.  Pictures and videos from the reunion are available for $3.00 from Todd Frommelt ( toddfrommelt@roadrunner.com ).  Here is the after action report:




After Action Report
TBS 4-69 45th Anniversary Reunion
12-15 September 2013


By the Executive Committee; Todd Frommelt, Bill Franklin, Ted Bahry, Robb Mitchell, Hugh Speed

Organization:  Bill has been, and continues to be, the keystone to the class. He maintains the official class roster in many forms. He has enumerated all available contact information, has attempted to find and has listed those remaining unfound and highlighted those we have lost…both to combat in Vietnam and since then. The genesis of this reunion was an agreement among several principles at our last (40th) reunion five years ago which Bill nearly single-handedly organized and ran. The “principles” list was expanded by email solicitations to come up with about 25-30 classmates who were willing to help in future reunion endeavors. Polling was done as to desired location and San Diego was selected by about the 1 ½ year out timeframe. Once San Diego was selected, a local reunion coordinator was designated, Todd, and a core group of classmates volunteered to assist as the “Executive Committee” enumerated above. Todd and Ted were very local with Hugh being just another 45 minutes North. Bill still ran the roster and class emails from Florida, Robb picked up nametag and miscellaneous duties and Ted and Hugh assisted Todd with all the local coordination. Email was our prime vehicle for coordination, liaison, and all things reunion. Snail mail and phone were used just to keep our non-email classmates advised.

Secondary organization: We put out a call to the larger reunion volunteer group and got another 15 or so volunteers, who thought they could make it to this reunion, to provide additional help as we got closer to the reunion. These gents provided good feedback on planning and helped a lot to support dining groups, touring groups, and miscellaneous services such as media shows, memorial reading and contact opportunities

                Lessons learned: This organization worked well. Don’t tell the next guy, but the local coordinator works his buns off as deadlines approach. We believe that running the show by ourselves saved us lots of money. Many reunion organizing businesses will run things for you, supposedly at no cost to you, but it is suspected that most vendors do not give such outfits their best prices.

Hotel Selection:  It was decided to have the Execs field trip to San Diego for on site evaluations. Based on reputations, word of mouth and historical reunion experience, several hotels were nominated. They were further selected based on a cross section of locations and expected expense. One year out, the field trip was conducted. We looked at the Bahia Resort, Mission Bay, the Town and Country Hotel, Mission Valley, the Marriot and Embassy Suites, both on San Diego Bay. The coordinator set up appointments, collected initial estimates and informational material and briefed the Execs before taking them around for tours and briefings by the hotel representatives. After the tours and an “Exec” conference, the Embassy Suites was selected. It offered a great central location, was reasonably priced, offered lots of benefits suited to reunions and a fine physical plant. Some of the benefits:  free breakfasts and happy hours every night, great rooms, reduced rate parking, excellent banquet room, a great hospitality suite at reduced rate, and a good space to hold our welcome reception Thursday nite. Banquet costs came in close to $80/person total, hot food at the Thursday reception added about $600+, and the large hospitality suite cost about $350/nite.

                Lessons learned: One year out is good for hotel selection. Much less than that and you may not get the hotel you want WHEN you want it. They were filling up for groups as we signed a contract. You greatly benefit from having as many events as possible at the same hotel you make your base. Pick a hotel that can host your welcome reception, your banquet and informal gatherings well.

Schedule formation:  It’s important to have a good feel for the area in which you’re meeting to make best use of the unique event options available. We polled the entire class on ideas, then used the volunteer group to refine, and decided on a schedule within the Execs. What we used as a general plan was to have registration/packet pick up throughout Thursday afternoon and evening; a welcome reception Thursday evening, a full class event schedule Friday during the day; then on your own…with help as desired…Friday evening dining with friends; all day Saturday on your own touring…with help as desired and; Saturday evening banquet. Sunday nothing scheduled. This seemed to work well and let us hire bus transport for one block of time only (all day for 2 busses ran about $2000 including tips).

                Lessons learned: We think that format is great. Max efficiency on the busses. Help with good dining and touring options for the area, especially for those who aren’t very outgoing, seemed to be well received and appreciated.

Major lead time items:  After deciding on place and time, your major assignment is to select a hotel. The hotel will be where most folks stay, where you are best able to welcome them, and if possible, where you will hold a welcome reception and main banquet. Keeping it simple is highly desirable. During the selection process, the hotels being considered will offer any number of benefits and discounts. Keep track of these!  Once selected, you can expect the local coordinator to sign a contract which will set a minimum number of rooms. We were tempted to go higher, but decided on 50 rooms for 3 nights, 150 room nites. We barely made it. We expect the 50th reunion to be better attended as it may well be our last and is a nice round number. Bill will have the best feel for numbers as he sees more email from all the class than most of us. Lets hope for 100+, but try for a much lower guarantee. Our hotel did give us a 20% fudge factor to play with. Regular liaison with your POC at the hotel is essential as plans develop and change. During the final two months, we had the hotel send us a report of names registered under our umbrella. This helped a lot. Doing the reception and banquet at the same hotel base let us work on reception and banquet particulars over a long period, letting us work on everything else for much of the 8 months or so before our date.

Schedule and logistics; Once you know the where and when, what you plan to do gets major emphasis, and you need to run through your options, select events for the schedule and start coordinating. Our concept quickly became a scheduled event day…MCRD graduation, lunch, Cabrillo National Monument, Fort Rosecrans memorial service and home. We worked with the MCRD S-3 for graduation attendance and seating, MCRD PMO for bus clearance, and the MCRD Bayview Restaurant for our luncheon. Coordinate with everyone conceivable to make sure things go smoothly. We further coordinated with the National Park gatekeepers for busload entries and found they would accept our word on “Senior Park Passes” available on each bus…while it otherwise would have cost us $100/bus for entry to Cabrillo National Park. This, BTW, was our desired class reunion picture location. Don’t forget to plan on one for the next reunion! We also coordinated with the Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery to make sure our short ceremony was deconflicted with their other operations. We put our desired schedule out for bid to 4 different bus companies in the area based on readily available user ratings. 6 months out for busses is the minimum time frame to solicit bids. Sign a contract with your selection not less than 4 months out. At 3 months out, two of our possibles were no longer available. Our plan allowed for Friday dinners and Saturday touring to be “on you own” to let folks relax and go their own way as much as they wanted after our full event day. We facilitated both dining and touring by offering up guides/mentors, suggestions and tons of informational emails. We selected four nearby quality restaurants with group guides/mentors who made reservations for their groups and guided them there. We highlighted area attractions with suggestions on what to see, time involved, and transportation options. San Diego’s City Tour seemed very well received by a class who hadn’t been here before…or at least lately. One note of interest: Our planned guided tour of the Flying Leatherneck Museum and MCAS Miramar MV-22’s went “official” too early. Due to “op tempo” AND the sequester, 3rd MAW denied our request for an MV-22 tour/orientation. As it turned out, the crew that went anyhow did get a nice tour of both the museum and the Osprey, the last thanks to a very helpful SSgt who just happened to have some extra time on his hands on a Saturday morning. Point being: if you’re planning on using Marine assets for any activities, beware of “op tempo” and fiscal constraints they’re dealing with forever…

Check-in packages: We provided each couple/single who attended an envelope at check-in with a set of materials key to a well run reunion. Number one on the list is a highly visible and readable nametag for everyone. We feel a lanyard is the most convenient attachment, but ours also had clips on the holders. Robb produced great 3 x 4” distinctive tags for us all, a light maroon USMC emblem background and black type names across the front. We were looking for readability in the social setting AND post reunion for photo captioning. Also in the envelope has to be a total reunion schedule of events. We also included area maps, touring information and any touring tickets ordered and purchased by the local coordinator (trolley tours, zoo, etc).

Decorations: We were lucky to have two full size cardboard Marine lieutenants provided by Robb (now in Todd’s attic for next time). These are not only attention getters, but can be adorned with signs. We used one at the hotel registration desk all day Thursday, with a sign for the Hospitality Suite reunion check in. Another went in front of the hospitality suite with a welcome sign. We moved the registration lieutenant to the hospitality suite after Thursday where he had posted a list of our deceased. In addition to the lieutenants, we now have two reunion banners, one 4’x 3’ horizontal and one about 2’ by 4’ vertical. These cover the suite, reception and banquet quite well. I think you can probably count on someone also bringing a USMC flag…and we used ours hung over the balcony in front of the suite. Todd does graphic work as a hobby and can make photos, signage and place settings as desired. We coordinated with the hotel to use black tablecloths and maroon and gold napkins at the banquet.

Budgeting:

This area’s a little tricky. You need pretty good ball park numbers early, of course, because you want to set a price for registration in time to let folks do some early planning. We’d say $150 each is maximum, otherwise a couple’s expenses get over the $300 just to start when they’re considering attendance. Add airfare, hotel room, food and incidentals and we’re talking about a significant commitment. Here’s a breakout of significant expenses to plan on, subject to your plan of attack…and don’t forget taxes and “service charges”!

            Hotel hospitality suite: We spent $350/night for a 2 Bdrm w/balcony unit  $1180
            Hotel reception: We had a free happy hour to play with, a free side room hotel gratis, cash bar hotel gratis, and hot
hors d'oeuvres for $750
            Bus transport: We used 2x55 person busses all day Friday, plus tips ($80/drvr) $2000
             MCRD luncheon: $1715. Very nice buffet for ~$13+/ person
            Hotel banquet: Gratis room, cash bar outside, their best buffet selection ($60+/person) and with 88 folks attending, the bill was ~$7000 (22% service charge, 8% tax)
            Stockage of Hospitality Suite: We went beer, wine, soda’s and some hard liquor (which we recommend NOT doing next time) and spent ~$500 ($800 less donation of $300)
            Raffle/door prizes: We spent about $300 not including $150 worth of donated gift cards, on a nice desk size sword and stand, patches, hats, decals etc. We also had decals and challenge coins donated and other miscellany. With donations, we raffled some 5 prizes at the welcome reception, 10 prizes/prize combos at the banquet and left the rest on a table for freebies at the end of the banquet….which were well received.


Hotel freebies! It should be noted that part of our hotel package included 1 free room nite for every 4 booked nights and got us 4 free nights at $179+/nite. We opted to use one free night as the grand prize at the banquet raffle (well received) and credited the rest to the on scene coordinator, me. I, in turn, credited the dollar value of that to the overall budget ($604.50). It should be noted also that my credit card was used for all the hotel expenses, giving me a benefit in “points” on my card.

Donations: We had hoped for $500 in cash donations at the Hospitality Suite (big jar appropriately labeled) and instead got about $300 included with folks registrations and another $1100 in cash at the hospitality suite! Additionally, the Executive Committee each donated in cash or goodies (raffle prizes, suite stockage, cash etc.) about $300 each or more.

Summary: Expenses (above) ~$13,445.00; Registration revenue at $125 each for 88 = $11000, hotel bonus nights $604, “seed” money from the 2008 reunion $2300, donations in cash $1800, for a total of $15,704.00. When all the dust settles, we hope to have a bit over $2000 to pass on to the next reunion.

One final note: The only actual prepaying we did was for deposits on the bus contract (10%) and on the MCRD luncheon ($250) which was a pleasant surprise. The hotel didn’t ask for ANYTHING  upfront! Of course, they DID have a room guarantee from us. Make sure you listen for those deposit remarks in your discussions with folks.

Highlights and lessons by the days: 
Wednesday: Thankfully we had some early arriving execs and held a pre-reunion meeting to discuss last minute coordination, decorating, suite setup, etc. We also partook of the happy hour….which had changed since we were last there 12 months ago. The snacks and other foods served were much reduced, making it imperative that our lengthy reception would need supplementary food. Early arrival execs took care of that Thursday morning…


Thursday: Setup went well, with the hotel able to provide the Hospitality Suite by noon. This is key and try to get them to commit to that “early check-in” in advance if at all possible. This let us set up with refreshments, check-in packages and décor prior to our first actual attendees arriving. We moved down to and utilized the hotel’s happy hour and then extended into our own cash bar for our reception. Since we went to about 2100, we felt it necessary to provide hot hors d'oeuvres.

Friday:  We had a busy day planned for Friday and were moving almost 100 folks by bus on 5 different legs of our trip. To not loose someone, we planned well and kept it simple. Bus assignments were alphabetical, the exec committee provided monitors, the monitors were provided lists for each bus, 2 signs for each bus and an envelope with the drivers’ tips enclosed. All went well and we advise something similar in the future. Regular full size busses generally carry about 55 folks each. At the MCRD graduation, we had an unexpectedly lengthy walk in to our bleacher seating. We had two classmates who would have benefited from some kind of transport. Keep that in mind at all your events….we expect it to be even more of an issue next time as we age! At Cabrillo for pictures, we had the monitors have folks go for the group photo first, then let them tour on their own and that worked fine. At Rosecrans for our memorial service, a volunteer prepared a short (5 minute) reading that was both non-denominational and inspirational. A memorial service is considered an essential part of our class reunions by us all. We got on our busses at 0845 and got dropped back off at about 1600. That’s a long day and is probably the outer limit. 1 or 2 folks thought it probably should have been shorter…

Friday night dinners:  While we provided restaurant info to folks via email leading up to the reunion, we wanted to offer a little more guidance and help to those who may have wanted or needed it to get out and about. We selected four restaurants for optional signups with a guide who would control a group of 8-12 folks for reservations, traveling to/from and other help. We ended up with some 65 folks using these groupings and overall they were very well received. Guides were from the execs and volunteer group. It helped that we did a good job matching folks wish lists for particular restaurants and dining companions.

Saturday: Touring on our own was facilitated by informational emails leading up to the reunion, a touring/S-1 office in one of the hospitality suite’s bedrooms with lots of literature, the hotel’s touring kiosks and concierge, and lots of word of mouth. A majority of folks used our recommended City Tour company with on and off all day privileges and loved it.

Saturday Banquet: Great buffet, but only one line forced us to control the flow. This resulted in some folks finishing while others were still on line. Suggest you push for a two line buffet if possible. We went from a hotel free happy hour up to the next floor banquet room seating for a short introduction program and table by table buffet line. Several folks recommended an open bar outside the banquet room as a transition space to the sit down banquet. We did have a cash bar outside but it wasn’t used much at all. We also had 2 bottles of wine on each table which weren’t used/consumed by too many folks coming off the free happy hour. Massage your plan next time in the transition area/time frame. The two line buffet may help that out.

Sunday: Nothing planned except tear down of the Hospitality Suite…taking down all décor, distributing excess snacks and drinks and cleaning the place up a bit. DO make sure the hotel check out staff is refreshed on any deals the reunion attendees rated on checkout. We had reduced rate parking that wasn’t clearly understood by the staff. You may also get reduced rate or free wifi, etc. and don’t need confusion at the checkout process.

Suggested Timeline for the Next Crew’s Planning:

One+ year out: Select the “Executive Committee” and Reunion Coordinator; start email process to determine when and where; start email process to determine what you want to do; start email process to come up with several hotel venues that fit the proposed activities; Exec’s do basic research on selected venues

One year out: Execs travel to location and interview venue reps; meet to select venue and authorize coordinator to sign venue contract; coordinator to sign contract; announce all to class via email; keep up interest from here on out with monthly emails

By 6 months out: Execs to have busses lined up and contract as time requires; complete coordination and sign contracts with other activity centers as applicable; set budget and determine registration fee; develop registration form

By 3 months out: Have a good feel for attendance and adjust plans as necessary; keep emails going to prompt registration; start planning décor and producing miscellaneous paperwork/signage

By 1 month out: Get aggressive pushing for final registrations. Procrastination is a killer for attendance so make a hard push early on. It’s easier for folks to cancel than make big plans late in the process.

 

Finally, let me summarize the after action input with some jointly derived points...

1. Location, location, location. This was a great one. Convenient, plenty within walking distance, etc.

2. Welcome reception needs food of substance to go past 1900. Thanks heavens our advance guys jumped on that one! Good thing we were there a day early to sample the current happy hour snacks! That’s a must do next time.

3. Although the Friday tour schedule was full, it sure got us max efficiency on busses. Some might want to shorten that type of day, but we got max bang for the bus buck Friday.

4. Having a hospitality suite is another must. We’d suggest making it beer, wine, sodas and snacks and let folks BYO for any hard liquor. We can save some bucks there too. As it was, we had a good deal of hard stuff left over.

5. Stand-up Lieutenants and banners seemed very well received. Hope they store OK in the attic! Remember Frommelt has them for next time!

6. Good comments on our media show off to the side of the banquet. Again, Frommelt has several disks of show available. Not sure it’s worth the trouble in the Suite unless we can set it up to run in a convenient location.

7. I think the full/heavy day of touring and an easy/on your own day worked fine. Bus efficiency was effective, getting a major reunion event, a major site-seeing opportunity and a very desirable memorial service completed in one day was a big plus for the reunion. Most of the next day off for desired site-seeing followed nicely.

8. We expect mobility issues may be more and more a factor as we get into our 70’s and 50th Anniversary Reunion timeframe. Plan on some wheelchair support requirements and make sure the registration process illuminates the needs of the class.

Some final points made by individual contributors…not all consensus) (our post reunion newsletter contained a feedback questionnaire) Maybe a shorter tour day (ours went from 0900 to 1600)?; to defray some costs, offer the Hospitality Suite to an attending couple for a discounted price and let them use exclusively what we intended to be a media show side room (if two or more bedrooms are included); MUST have a banquet facility or restaurant in the hotel or next door for the major Saturday dinner; no need for media show OR hard liquor at Hospitality Suite; need to remind Hotel managers/group managers to make sure that checkout reception staff are aware of all “deals” made for the reunion…like our reduced rate on parking. Perhaps that could be an assignment for early arriving executive committee guys?; ensure the hotel is prepared to make extra cleaning efforts through the weekend in the Suite and make sure they have extra chairs and trash cans placed in the hospitality suite for its heavy use. Most folks liked the raffles, thought the memorial service essential, liked the media show, especially at the banquet (off to the side), liked the optional restaurant guides setup, and we had two votes for New Orleans in five years, but most were adamant about going back to DC/Quantico area….noting that Quantico will soon have its own hotel/convention center too.

That’s it for me! Hope this helps the next crew! Semper Fidelis, Hun sends

See news for the next reunion in this space in 2017.
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This site is dedicated to the Marines who graduated from Basic Class 4-69 and are now guarding the streets of heaven.
TBS CLASS 4-69 MARKER AT MARINE CORPS HERITAGE MUSEUM
GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN
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MICHAEL W. BASSLER
Died 5 January 1993 in Vashon, WA
Verified by SSN Death Records
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Robert V. Black, Jr.
Executed by the State of Texas 22 May 1992
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Albert M. Braddock, Sr.
Died 25 May 2013
Verified by his Wife

Major Albert M. Braddock Sr., USMC Ret., passed away May 25 after a courageous battle with cancer. 

He is survived by his parents Marvin and Frances Braddock of Baldwin, FL, his wife Dianna of Asheville, five children Albert M. "Mitch" Braddock, Jr. (Jen) USAF, Germany, Cheri Wheeler (James) of McKinney, TX, Tracey Millar (Brett) of Fletcher, NC, Michelle Maynor (Teddy) of Asheville, NC, Ronald E. Youngblood Jr. of Asheville, NC; seven grandchildren that he loved dearly, Hailey Braddock, Cortney Braddock, Stacy M. Ahrens (Dan), T.J. Maynor, Jacob Maynor, Kaylee Millar, Shelby Millar; his brother Clarence M. "Butch" Braddock, Jr. of Dothan, AL; three nephews and their families; and his mother-in-law, Mildred Massey of Asheville.


Al served his country proudly as a United States Marine for 22 years. He enlisted in the Marine Corps in 1965, he received his commission in 1968 and retired as a Major in 1987. After retiring from the Marine Corps, "Maj" was a corporate pilot and then began a career as a successful real-estate broker/owner at Keller Williams Professionals Asheville. 


All of his life Al worked to serve God. During his travels in the military and as a corporate pilot he was always a member of his local church. He was most recently an active member of Skyland First Baptist Church where he was instrumental part of the Building Committee and an outstanding Sunday School teacher. 


He was a current Gideon in the Asheville Camp and served as the President/CEO of Experiencing God Through Missions, Inc. You could hear him say he was "Putting Christianity into Action". Al's faith was evident in the way he lived his life, everyone that knew him knew that he walked the walk and talked the talk.


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THOMAS E. CARUSO
KIA RVN
2LT - O1 - Marine Corps - Reserve Born on Saturday, May 25, 1946 From ANAHEIM, CA.
Length of service 2 years. His tour began on May 12, 1969 Casualty was on Sep 23, 1969. In QUANG TRI, SOUTH VIETNAM NON-HOSTILE, GROUND CASUALTY ACCIDENTAL SELF-DESTRUCTION. Body was recovered.

 
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THOMAS D. CUNNINGHAM
Died 27 November 1994
Verified by SSN Death Records
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Donald E. Braum
Died 3 October 2011 in Arlington VA.
Verified by SSN Death Records
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ASHTON S. BULLARD
Died 10 May 2006

Ash Bullard (left) with Bill Franklin in Dong Ha 1968.
Ashton Stone Bullard, 60, of North Palm Beach, Fla., previously of Durham, N.H., died May 10 at St. Mary’s Hospital in West Palm Beach, Fla. His death came shortly after he suffered an extensive brain hemorrhage. "Ash" Bullard was president and chief executive officer of Thomas and Bullard Inc. of North Palm Beach, a local contracting company providing quality, affordable single family homes throughout the Palm Beach-Port St. Lucie area. Mr. Bullard is the former president of Anchor Miami Propeller in Miami. He is a former resident of Coral Gables, Fla. Prior to moving to Florida, he was a contractor, with businesses in Durham, N.H., and White River Junction, Vt. He was a U.S. Marine Corps 1st Lieutenant in the 3rd Marine Batallion serving in Vietnam. Mr. Bullard is survived by his beloved three children, Colton, 6, of North Palm Beach, Chandler, 29, of San Diego, Calif., and Juli, 34 of Portsmouth. In addition to his children he is survived by his sisters, Nancy Stone of Portsmouth and Pamela Bullard of Philadelphia; his brother, Roland Bullard of Philadelphia; his sister-in-law Sally; niece and nephew; and many devoted friends in New England and Florida. A memorial service will be held June 3 in Portsmouth. WE REMEMBER: He was a Freemason, St. Andrew’s Lodge No. 56, in Portsmouth, N.H., where he was also active in civic affairs. He graduated from Syracuse University and was president of the 1964 graduating class in East Bridgewater, Mass. He was born in Stoughton, Mass. Over the years, he was happiest when he was with his children and boating off the New England and Florida coasts.

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ALEXANDER J. CELINSKI
Died 19 October 2010

ALEXANDER "AL" CELINSKI, JR., 63, went home to be with The Lord on October 19, 2010 of a sudden heart attack. A service will be held to remember and celebrate his life at Forest Park The Woodlands at 1 pm Saturday, October 23. Visitation will be Friday, October 22 from 6-8 p.m. at the funeral home.Al was born January 15, 1947 in New York to Alexander and Virginia Celinski. He graduated from high school and served our country bravely and proudly in Vietnam as a 1st Lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps. He moved to Texas in 1965, graduated from Stephen F. Austin State University, and in 1973 married his college sweetheart, Julaine Dunston. They made their home in Spring, TX, where he worked faithfully at Vista Bank Texas.He was a loving and Godly husband and father, whose love and passion will live on in his family. Al was devoted to his grown children Scott Alan, Laura Elaine, and Todd Austin, and their spouses Laura Catherine, Brian Alexander, and Pamela Ashley. Al is also survived by his grandchildren Beckham Alexander, Sadie Piper, and Berkley Anastasia, who affectionately refer to him as "Ompah". They have peace knowing he will spend eternity in heaven with Jesus Christ his Savior. Al will be fondly remembered and sadly missed by his sister, Denise, and her family, Pat and Aileen Nestor.He found joy traveling and spending time with his wife. He loved spending his down time scuba diving and golfing with family and friends. He will always be remembered for his dry sense of humor, generous heart, and love of life. We know he echoes Paul when he says, "For to me to live is Christ, and to die is gain." (Phil 1:21)
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GREGORY J. CONNERS
Died 12 November 1977


Sergeant Gregory J. Conners Fort Lauderdale Police Department Florida
End of Watch: Saturday, November 12, 1977
Biographical InfoAge: 31Tour of Duty: 5 years
USMC Veteran: Service Number 0108282
Joined the Marine Corps in September 1967;
First Lt. Conners was released from active duty October 1971
4th ANGILCO in South Florida 1971-1977

Incident DetailsCause of Death: Vehicular assault, Date of Incident: Saturday, November 12, 1977Weapon Used: Automobile; Alcohol involved.
Sergeant Conners was killed when his motorcycle was struck by a vehicle being operated by an intoxicated driver. Sergeant Conners had been with the agency for five years and was survived by his wife (Shirley M. Conners) and one daughter.
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OLIVER E. DEAL, JR.
KIA RVN
2LT - O1 - Marine Corps - Reserve Born on Monday, October 28, 1946 From LANCASTER, CA. Length of service 2 years. His tour began on Oct 29, 1969. Casualty was on Nov 1, 1969 In QUANG NAM, SOUTH VIETNAM. HOSTILE, GROUND CASUALTY ARTILLERY, ROCKET, or MORTAR. Body was recovered.

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JOHN F. DEMARS
Died in 1993 in San Diego, CA
Verified by SSN Death Records

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ROBERT M. DESORRENTO
Died 10 June 1994 in New York
Verified by SSN Death Index and his Son

Capt. Tonio De Sorrento, USMC
(Robert's Son)
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LARRY W. DUDLEY
Died 4 June 2011

DUDLEY Larry Wenzel Dudley, 65 went to be with the Lord on 4 June 2011. Larry was born shortly after his brother Garry, an identical twin, Sept 15, 1945 in Houston TX to Justein Osment (mother) and William Warren Dudley (father). Larry was raised by his step-father (Welton Richard Red Osment). Larry was a devoted husband, loving dad, proud grandpa, caring uncle and brother-in-law. He proudly served in the United States Marine Corps for 23 years, first enlisting and then as a commissioned officer, retiring as a Major. Larry was a Vietnam veteran and Phantom pilot, completing 53 combat missions over Southeast Asia. He graduated from the Navy fighter weapons school Top Gun. He attended Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University earning a Bachelor and Masters degree and subsequently teaching for the University years later on the subjects of aircraft accident investigation and project management. He was a Project Management Professional and past president of the Jacksonville PMI chapter. He is survived by his wife Nellie, daughters Barbara Beck (Sidney) and Elizabeth Baker (David Thornton-fianc), and sons Brian McQuaid (Jenny) and Richard Dudley. Larry is also survived by his mother Justein, sister Marjorie Landgrebe (Vic), and brother Garry (Tina). Larry was the proud Papa of Katelyn, Austin, Kayla, Megan, Garrett, and Jason. He was a wonderful neighbor, friend and mentor to many. Visitation will be Thursday, 9 June, at Jacksonville Memory Gardens from 5:00 7:00 P.M. A Memorial Mass will be held Friday, 10 June, at St Catherines Catholic Church, Orange Park, FL at 2:00 P.M.

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Terry L. Fleming


Born on Sep. 10, 1945
Departed on Jun. 1, 2013 and resided in Banks, OR.

Terry L. Fleming, 67, a resident of the Banks community, died Saturday afternoon, June 1, 2013 at Henry Hagg Lake in Gaston OR.
TERRY LOWELL FLEMING was born on September 10, 1945 in Portland, Oregon, the son of the late Jackson and Joyce (Stanley) Fleming. He was raised and received his education in the communities of Portland, Oregon and Denver, Colorado, having been a graduate with Abraham Lincoln High School Class of 1963, in Denver, Colorado. Upon his graduation he attended the University of Nevada, where he received his Bachelor's Degree in Business.

He was a Veteran of the Vietnam Era, having joined the United States Marines on October 4, 1968. Terry served in the 3rd Marine Air Wing for four years as a bomber/navigator until receiving his honorable discharge at the rank of Captain in 1974.
Upon his discharge, they moved to Eugene, Oregon, where he attended the University of Oregon, having received his Master’s in Business Administration

Terry was united in marriage to Kathleen G. Reid on September 27, 1969 in Pensacola, Florida. They would have celebrated their forty fourth wedding anniversary this coming September. Following their marriage they made their home in the community of Cherry Point, North Carolina for a year and a half.
Terry was co-owner and operated of TRS Technologies, a computer software company in Beaverton from 1981 to 1993 when he retired.

He was a active member of Dayspring Christian fellowship in Banks for many years and the American Legion Post #90 in Banks Among his special interests, he enjoyed the outdoors, especially jogging, fishing, camping and golf. Terry also enjoyed flying as he had his private pilot’s license. He was very active in scouting, having served as the in various capacities for several years.
Survivors include his wife, Kathleen G. "Kathy" Fleming, of the family home in Banks, Oregon;
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CLAIR W. FOLEY
Died in October 1983 in Pasco, WA
Verified by his wife Patricia Foley
The following was provided by Pat Foley:

Clair went back to School to get his Masters after leaving the Marine Corps. Eastern Washington State College near Spokane WA. From there Went back to Pacific University and coached football for a year, his father fell 26 feet and broke most of his bones so that brought us back To Pasco, Washington where he taught and coached football he stayed there until his death in 1983. The students loved his war stories.
They would get him going and he loved it. He never talked about the bad things. The war did change him. Clair was well liked by everyone.

We raised 2 great children. Michael, who lives in New York, went on to West Point after High School. He stayed in the army for 5 years and then to Harvard Business School. His dad was a great influence on him. Kathy lives here in Seattle. She went on to college Washington State Univ. She is one of the many Vice Pres at Bank of America. Clair Always said we raised 2 great people. We use to have to remind him we were not one of his military men. I have 3 grandsons with a new baby on the way in August from Michael and Monica in New York. By the way Monica is a reporter with MSNBC Monica Novotny is her name she is on a lot so watch MSNBC and you will see her on the news reporting.

Franklin, Frommelt, Foley, Rice
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JAMES C. GILMORE
Died 12 April 2003
Verified by his wife
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THOMAS M. HOPKINS
Died 31 October 1999
Verified by SSN Death Index
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SAMUAL E. JAMES
Died 12 July 1997
Verified By SSN Death Index
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GARY A. KEACH
Died 19 December, 2000
Verified by SSN Death Index
Gary A. Keach, 58, of Jacksonville, died Tuesday, Dec. 19, 2000, at Doctors Hospital of Nelsonville. Born July 20, 1942, in Gilford, N.Y., he was the son of the late Bud and Mary Keach. He was in the U.S. Marines Corps from 1960 to 1973 and served as a drill sergeant at Paris Island., S.C. In 1973, he joined the Navy until 1980 when he retired as a first lieutenant. He taught at Hocking College in the recreation and wildlife department, and was a member of the Marine Mustang Club, Jacksonville Veterans of Foreign Wars and Albany AMVETS. He is survived by his wife, Margaret J. Bradshaw Keach of Jacksonville; three sons, Gary Jr., Gregory and Gene Keach, all of New York; a daughter, Kimberly Keach of New York; two stepdaughters, Robin Clementz of Jacksonville and Tracie Allen of Austintown; a stepson, Brain Peck of Austintown; six grandchildren; a brother, Kevin Keach; and a sister, Linda Keach. Besides his parents, he was preceded in death by a brother, Craig Keach. Services will be Saturday at 11 a.m. at Cardaras Funeral Home, Glouster, with the Rev. Gary Carlson officiating. Burial will be held Wednesday at 1 p.m. in Dayton National Cemetery, where military graveside services will be conducted by the U.S. Marine Color Guard Unit. Friends may call at the funeral home Friday from 5 to 8 p.m., with a VFW service at 7:30 p.m. conducted by the Jacksonville VFW Post 9866.
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WALTER B. KELLEY
Died 2004
Verified By SSN Death Index
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JOHN LAROSE
Died August 1970 in Yuma AZ
Verified By SSN Death Index

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GARY W. LETSON

KIA RVN
2LT - O1 - Marine Corps - Regular Born on Monday, February 12, 1945. From SAN FRANCISCO, CA.
Length of service 0 years. His tour began on May 23, 1969. Casualty was on Jun 18, 1969 In QUANG TRI, SOUTH VIETNAM HOSTILE, GROUND CASUALTY OTHER EXPLOSIVE DEVICE. Body was recovered.
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TOM P. LUDDY
Died in 2002 in Salt Lake City, UT
Thomas P. Luddy, 55, of 44 Osborn Road, Naugatuck, died unexpectedly Feb. 17 in Salt Lake City, Utah, while working at the Olympics. Mr. Luddy was born March 8, 1946, in Waterbury, son of John J. and Maxine (Hoffman) Luddy of Waterbury. He was a graduate of St. Mary's Grammar School, Sacred Heart High School, and Mount St. Mary's College in Emmitsberg, Md. In 1968, he was named to Who's Who among students in American colleges. He was a captain in the U.S. Marine Corps and served in Vietnam during the Vietnam War. Mr. Luddy was formerly employed by the U.S. Treasury Department as a U.S. Secret Service Agent and until the time of his death owned and operated his own private security business. He was a member of the American Society for Industrial Security, the Association of Former Agents of the U.S. Secret Service, the U.S. Marine Corps Law Enforcement Foundation, and the U.S. Secret Service/U.S. Marine Corps Foundation. Besides his parents, he is survived by a son, Ryan of United States Marine Corps of Camp Jejuene, N.C.; three daughters, Seana and Alyssa of New Milford and Colleen of San Diego; two brothers, Kevin of Cheshire and Terrence of New Milford; two sisters, Carolyn Minervino of Mashpee, Mass., and Brenda Marchi of Wilton; a longtime companion, Catherine Libonate of Danbury; and his former wife, Patricia of New Milford. The Murphy Funeral Home of Waterbury was in charge of arrangements. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Luddy children, c/o Seana Luddy, 54 Dean Road, New Milford, CT 06776.
Luddy in Vietnam
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ROBERT A. MOERMOND
Died 1987 in MN
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MELVIN D. QUINN
KIA RVN
1LT - O2 - Marine Corps - Reserve Born on Wednesday, March 10, 1948. From MERCED, CA.
Length of service 2 years. His tour began on Dec 6, 1969. Casualty was on Apr 1, 1970 In QUANG NAM, SOUTH VIETNAM. Hostile, died of wounds, GROUND CASUALTY GUN, SMALL ARMS FIRE. Body was recovered.

****************************************************
RAYMOND W. REISNER, Jr.
Raymond Wilhelm Reisner, Jr. Captain, United States Marine Corps
Captain Raymond Wilhelm Reisner, Jr. United States Marine Corps, was born January 2, 1947 in Hartford, Connecticut into a career United States Army family. His parents were Colonel Raymond Wilhelm Reisner, Sr., United States Army, Marian I. Reisner.
Reisner graduated from Carlisle Senior High School, Carlisle, Pennsylvania, in 1966. He attended West Chester State College, West Chester, Pennsylvania, in 1966-67.
Reisner enlisted in the United States Marine Corps in 1967 and was commissioned a second lieutenant in 1968 after graduating from the Marine Corps Officers Candidate School, Quantico, Virginia. He served in Vietnam from May, 1969 to March, 1970.
After his tour of duty in Vietnam, he was assigned as the operations officer for the maintenance branch of the Marine Corps Supply Center, Albany, Georgia.
While assigned here, he married Miss Susan Wallace Hobbie, also a 1966 Carlisle High School graduate. Susan had graduated from Rollins College, Winter Park, Florida.
On September 23, 1972, Bill was assigned as the communications officer to the United States Marine Corps Air Support Squadron I. He died in a helicopter crash at Grytoya Island, Norway, while participating in the Joint NATO Operation "Strong Express."
Captain Reisner was an Episcopalian.
The Captain's awards and commendations include the Navy Commendation Ribbon with V, Civic Action Award with Palm, Vietnamese Campaign Medal, Combat Action Ribbon, Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry with Palm, Vietnamese Service Medal with Four Stars and the National Defense Service Medal.
Captain Reisner is buried in Arlington National Cemetery near his father and mother and brother, Howard Reisner.
Newspaper research by Sara Snyder. Additional information provided by Susan Hobbie Goodridge
REISNER, RAYMOND W JR CPT USMC DATE OF BIRTH: 01/02/1947 DATE OF DEATH: 09/23/1972 BURIED AT: SECTION 6 SITE 8751-A-B ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY
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WILLIAM F. REILLY
Died 30 Mar 2010 in Melrose, MA
Verified by SSN Death Index
REILLY, William F. Of Melrose, March 30, 2010, age 64. Loving husband of the late Denise B. (Lynch) Reilly. Brother of Robert J. Reilly Jr. of Chelsea. Brother-in-law of Maureen Gross of Swampscott, Clare Lynch of Melrose and Regina Bixby & her husband Bob of Melrose. Uncle of Stephen Gross, Jessica, Matthew & Ryan Bixby. Funeral from the Gately Funeral Home 79 W. Foster St. Melrose, on Monday April 5th at 10:30AM. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated in William's memory at Incarnation Church, 425 Upham St. Melrose, at 11:00AM. Relatives & friends invited. Visiting hours Monday morning from 8:30-10:30AM. Interment in Wyoming Cemetery in Melrose. US Marine Corps Vietnam War Veteran & recipient of the Bronze Star & Purple Heart.
A note from Regina Bixby regarding Bill Reilly:
Attaching some pictures of Bill Reilly that you asked my husband Bob to send on to you. Sorry they aren't in color.
I am Bill's sister-in-law Regina Bixby. I thought, because of all the trouble you went to to try to find Bill, that I would give you a brief history of his life.
During his last year in the Marines Bill met my younger sister Denise while home on leave. Upon his discharge Bill settled in Medford, MA with his mother and then got a job at Gillette in Boston as a machinest. While working he attended evening classes and got his BA in Accounting at Bentley College. (He was always good at math.) For whatever reason, he did not pursue a career in accounting chosing instead to continue his job at Gillette which he loved.
He married my sister in July of 1978 and bought a home in Melrose, MA. Bill & Denise never had any children. They had a very loving marriage that lasted just short of 25 years. Denise passed away in June of 2003 after a 4 year battle with breast cancer. Bill was at her side at all times during this battle; supportive, encouraging, and dedicated to her. Needless to say, her death took a toll on him.
Bill was an avid gardner (who would have thought it). For years he had a beautiful vegetable garden providing use with the fruits of his labor. He also grew from seed many beautiful flowers that florished and brightened their yard. They took many trips to his favorite place: Ireland. Bill just loved Ireland (getting back to his roots I guess); the history, culture, and people!
As you can see in the pictures, Bill never put on weight. He continued to have a size 30" waist throughout his life. He did have some health issue though. A mild stroke in his 40s and adult diabetes in his 50s. While he gave up beer in his early 50s he continued to smoke a couple of packs of Camels a day until his death. He retired from Gillette in January of 2007 after 34 years.
As I mentioned earlier, Denise's death look a toll on Bill. They were each other's best friend. He only had 1 brother who was older than him and in poor health. After her death he did spend more time visiting his brother and did a lot for him. Her death also brought him back to his Catholic faith which I think helped him a lot. But the bottom line he was quite sad without her.
I know that it would have made him very happy to have heard from you. His life in the Marines was something that he talked about often and was very proud of. At his funeral the Marines sent a large contingency (8-10 folks) which I am sure he would have loved. (Their grave stone [which he designed when Denise died] has an engraving of an angel for her and the Marine Corp insignia for him.)
Well I guess that's about it...let me know if there is anything else you would like to know. Again, I only wish that you two had connected but I guess that was not meant to be. Bill was a great brother-in-law and I and my children miss him a lot.
A note from Robb Mitchell: After TBS, Bill became a rifle plt commander with Golf 2/4, 3rd Mar Div. In late September they were up on Mutters Ridge and got hit at night. Bill was wounded severely enough to be sent back to the States. Not sure how he finished out his time.
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STANLEY C. ROGERS
Died 30 August 2013
          

Memorial services for Stanley Clair Rogers, 67, of Mechanicsville, will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday, September 7, at Lebanon United Methodist Church; 8492 Peaks Road, Hanover, Va. 23069, with the Rev. Spencer Broce officiating. Visitation will be held on Friday, September 6, between 6 and 8 pm at Woody Funeral Home -Atlee Chapel; 9271 Shady Grove Road (Rte. 301), Mechanicsville, Va. 23116. Graveside services will be conducted at a later date at the United States Marine Corps National Cemetery in Quantico, Va. Mr. Rogers, having lived life to praise and glorify God in all he had done, passed peacefully on to the Lord early Friday, August 30, 2013. Stan was preceded in death by his father, Bunny Rogers; his mother, Betty Rae Thompson-Rogers-Duty; stepfather, Richard Duty; and brother, David Duty. He is survived by his wife, Vicki (Mechanicsville); his two daughters, Sarah Rogers (Mechanicsville) and Claire Snelson (Chester Gap,Va.); his son-in-law, Joseph Snelson; and his grandson and best bud, Jameson Snelson. Stan is also survived by seven brothers and sisters, Steve Rogers and wife, Patty, (Stillwater, Okla.), Susan Rogers (Ada, Okla.), Sam Rogers (Santa Fe, N.M.), Scott Rogers and wife, Nicole, (Albuquerque, N.M.), Teresa Duty (Santa Fe, N.M.), Clint Duty and wife, Beth, (Tulsa, Okla.), Holly Easterling (Ada, Okla.) and Kathleen (Mrs. David) Duty (Ada, Okla.); as well as 20 nieces and nephews. Family meant everything to Stan. He leaves behind a very large extended family, each one of whom he loved dearly. Stan was born in Ada, Okla., July 14, 1946, to Bunny and Betty Rae Rogers. He graduated Salutatorian of his class at Stonewall family and friends up to date on high school and college football standings during their seasons and was a staunch High School (Stonewall, Okla.) in 1964, and attended classes at East Central State College before enlisting in the United States Marine Corps in 1966. He served five years, including having served in Vietnam in 1969, and left USMC as an Infantry Officer. Upon his return from the service, he met and married the love of his life, Vicki Eugenia Teeter. Stan graduated from Oklahoma State University in Agricultural Economics in 1974. Stan began his professional career as a Corporate Planner with Gold Kist Cooperative in 1978 in Atlanta, Ga., where Stan and Vicki raised their two daughters. In 1998, Stan began work with Southern States Cooperative in Richmond, Va., ending his time there as Director of Public Relations and Corporative Events. Stan celebrated his official retirement in 2012. Stan also loved sports and politics. He kept political pundit. Stan never knew a stranger, merely a friend he had yet to become more acquainted with.

*******************************************************
SERGE B. SIMMONS
KIA RVN
Length of service 2 years. His tour began on May 10, 1969. Casualty was on Nov 3, 1969 In QUANG NAM, SOUTH VIETNAM. Hostile, died of wounds, GROUND CASUALTY MULTIPLE FRAGMENTATION WOUNDS. Body was recovered.
Serge Benson Simmons was born 4 March 1944 in Ogden, Utah to Sergene Benson and Frank Charles Simmons. They lived in Ogden until moving to Roy, Utah in the 1950's. Serge has two brothers David and Frank. Serge graduated in 1962 from Weber High School. He then married his high school sweetheart, Jane, and together they had three children; Chantile, Wendy and Timothy. Serge completed his studies early, and together they both received their degrees from Weber State University in 1969. On about 5 march 1969, 2nd Lt. Simmons completed Basic School (Cl 4-69) and reported to the Commanding General, 5th MarDiv (Rein), FMF, Camp Pendleton, CA for duty. He was then ordered to report to the CG, Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, CA for duty with FMFPAC, WESTPAC, Ground Forces for further duty with the 9th MOB (MCPC 159) and was further assigned to 1st Replacement Company for processing. On 21 March 1969 he was then ordered to the Transient Facility, Camp Butler, Okinawa and directed to report to the CG, Ninth Marine Amphibious Brigade (MCC 159) for duty. On 18 April 1969 his orders were modified to report to the CG, First Marine Division for duty. He arrived at Da Nang, RVN on 9 May 1969 and reported to 1st MarDiv Headquarters and was directed to the 1st marines for duty. From 10 May 1969 to 5 July 1969 he served as the Weapons Platoon Commander of A Company, 1st Battalion, 1st Marines, 1st Marine Division. From 6 July 1969 to 3 Nov. 1969 he served as the Second Rifle Platoon Commander of A Company, 1st Battalion, 1st Marines, 1st MarDiv. He was mortally wounded on 3 November 1969 from a land mine. He is buried in the Ogden City Cemetery.
1st Lt. Serge B. Simmons earned the following Awards:
Purple Heart - 11/3/69
Combat Action Ribbon - 2/17/69
National Defense Medal - 10/5/68
Vietnam Service Medal 2/1 star - 5/10/69
Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal - 11/3/69
Bronze Star w/Combat Distinguishing Device - posthumously
********************************************
BYRON M. TRAPNELL
Died 14 April 2010
Verified by SSN Death Index
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DENNIS VACENOVSKY
KIA RVN
1stLT - O2 - Marine Corps - Reserve Born Thursday, August 26, 1943. BROOKSVILLE, FL.
Length of service 2 years. His tour began on Jan 31, 1970. Casualty was on Oct 5, 1970 In QUANG NAM, SOUTH VIETNAM HOSTILE, GROUND CASUALTY MULTIPLE FRAGMENTATION WOUNDS. Body was recovered.
*********************************************
JERRY L. WALTERS
Died 24 March 2003 in Los Angeles, CA
Verified by SSN Death Index
************************************************
JEFFREY F. WEED
Died 6 April 1972
Verified by SSN Death Index
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40th REUNION INFORMATION
The 40th Reunion was a great success. 130 people attended and had a great time. The Embassy Suites Hotel provided excellent service to our group including free breakfast every morning and a great banquet on Saturday night. The events at 8th and I and Quantico were excellent experiences for everyone. Now that it is past we need to keep the flame alive through periodic Platoon mini-reunions until our next (45th) Reunion in 2013.
The next reunion will most likely be on the west coast and planning will start about a year out (2012). As that time approaches I will solicate volunteers to assist in planning and execution of the reunion. Will need some west coast folks to pitch in for this one. Thanks in advance.
Some Pictures from the reunion and a reminder that all the pictures that Phil Foster took are available for download or print orders on shutterfly.
TBS 469 REUNION Group at Museum
First Platoon at Reunion
2nd Platoon at Banquet
3rd Platoon at Banquet
4th Platoon at Banquet
5th Platoon at Banquet
TBS469 O-8s
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HISTORY

Basic School Class 4-69 was somewhat unique in that it was composed of a large number of former enlisted Marines who were sent to Quantico under the Enlisted Commissioning Program (ECP) and attended Officer's Candidate School as part of the 52nd Special Officer's Candidate Course. Basic Class 4-69 was made up of about 150 ECPs and another 100 Marines who were commissioned through the Platoon Leaders Course (PLC) Program. We called ourselves "The Field Company" and our motto was DILLIGAS.

In the end, we were all well trained basic Marine Corps 2nd Lts heading for Vietnam.
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  Special OCC Company F 1st Platoon
Front Row: 1st Lt Mozakis, Shaw, Cunningham, Johnson, Demars, Taylor, McAndrews, Rice, Estes, Rands, SSgt. Camp, SSgt. Benton
Second Row: Brochert, Phelps, Sherry, Welborn, Vacenovsky, Dudley, Ready, Rogers, Novelli, Marquis, Franklin, Ludwig, Whiteside
Third Row: Frommelt, Cox, Cuseo, Luddy, Platter, Milliberry, McCoy, Bell, Houck, Mitchell, Porter, Celinski, Belrose
Fourth Row: Foley, Buettner, Laughinghouse, Baker, Taylor, Pallo, Moses ********************************************************
52nd Special OCC Company F 2nd Platoon
First Row: 1st Lt. Cook, Barnhart, Denley, Meyer, Macaluso, UNK, Spears, Kobia, Pelham, SSgt Petterson, Sgt Gronadur
Second Row: Edgerton, UNK, Abanto, Gilliam, Rutherford, Chadwick, UNK, Branca, LaBrie, Pound, Zrenda
Third Row: Jones, Gross, Cuseo, UNK, Neil, Gresham, Pennington, Keach, Howie, UNK, Mitchell
Fourth Row: Quinn, Schultz, Desorrento, Whitehill, Fulks, Messer
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52nd Special OCC Company E 1st Platoon
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52nd Special OCC Company E 3rd Platoon
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CURRENT MEMBERS OF BASIC CLASS 4-69 REUNION GROUP
**********************************
Larry G. Adkins
 ******************************
Peter T. (Ted) Bahry, Jr.
Dropped out of High School and enlisted in the Marine Corps at age 17 plus one day, in Fulton, N.Y., Parris Island Platoon 236.
Became cannon cocker at Camp Lejeune and went by ship to Okinawa in 1960. Stayed in Westpac over five years straight, unaccompanied.
Last tour then was as Sgt in Vietnam.
Had second tour in Vietnam as Gunnery Sgt. Two weeks later I was at OCS !
At TBS, I felt like I was back in the USMC.
Went back to Vietnam as Arty Officer and tour (plus voluntary extension) included duty with 1/11, 3/1, and lst Recon Bn. Finished up as CO of Mortar Btry, 1/11.
After various other tours, retired as Major with 28+ years service. Haven't had time to get paying job since.
After TBS, I had a trying tour as patient in USN Hospital Bethesda where all the doctors (post TET) wanted to discharge me on a medical !
I later married a Navy nurse (Jo) I met there and we are still married with a daughter, 33.
We have a home near Camp Pendleton and another lakeside in northern Michigan.
Life is good.
I am a long time military historian, stamp collector and sometime writer. I have collected USMC memorabelia for some years. Am very active with local American Legion Post in northern Michigan.
Along the way while on active duty I got a masters degree in management which some said over-qualified me for government work !
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Michael E. Barnhart
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Gary C. Barnett
Personal
Married to Judy K. Barnett – 42 Years (November 27, 1965)
Son – Casey C. Barnett – Born at Quantico Naval Hospital – 10/18/1970
Grandsons – Logan (12-years) and Mason (7-years)
USMC Experience
First Battalion, Ninth Regiment, 3rd Marine Division:
Platoon Commander – Republic of Vietnam and Okinawa, R.I.
Football Coach – USMC Team – Okinawa, R.I.
Quantico MCB: Football Coach (Linebackers) – USMC 1970 Team – College Schedule
Instructor – Staff NCO Academy (Inaugural Class)
Education: Coaching & Teaching Career
Western Kentucky University – Graduate Assistant (1-year)
M.A. in Education – Exercise Physiology
Full-time Receiver Coach – Ohio Valley Champions
Southeast Missouri State University (2-years)
Instructor of Physical Education
Assistant Football Coach – Passing Game – MIAA Champions
Missouri State University (3-years)
Instructor of Physical Education
Assistant Football Coach – Offensive Coordinator
Business Experience
Companies: (31-years)
Xerox Corporation, ADP, ITT, Pathlore Software, BellSouth Business, GERS Retail Systems, Starbase Corp., Tegrity, Inc., and SunGard Higher Education.
Currently the VP of Sales at Option Technologies Interactive, LLC.
Positions: Account Executive, Regional Manger, VP of National Accounts, VP of Business Development, and VP of Sales.
Consultant:
Samar Enterprises and Option Technologies Interactive, LLC


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Peter T. Baron
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William M. Baumann
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James B. Bell, Jr.
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Morris R. (Dick) Bell
1956-1971: After TBS I went to Fort Sill, OK for Arty Training. Went to Vietnam (G/1/9, D/1/3) then Okinawa and Camp Pendleton. We left the Marine Corps in 1971, Judy, our daughter Susan and I.
1971-1973: Taught and coached at Lincoln High School in Alabama.
1973-1974: Graduate Assistant in Physical Education while Judy and I completed our BS and Master’s Degrees on the GI Bill at Jacksonville State University.
1974-1975: Judy began teaching at Jacksonville Elementary School while I taught and coached at Weaver High School in Alabama.
1975-2000: I taught and coached cross-country and track at Jacksonville State University until retirement in 2000. During those years we also did graduate work at the University of Alabama and Florida State University. Judy did not retire so I went to work part-time with Valuteachers, and organization that manages 403K tax sheltered annuities mainly for public school employees.
We have three grandchildren and live in Jacksonville, Alabama.
Looking forward to seeing everyone at the reunion.
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Bruce R. Belrose
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Eric H. Bowen
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William F. Box
Billy Box (Ford)*
*Name change to Ford for family reasons.
Beginning April 1966 ...
MCRD Parris Island, SC
OCC/TBS Quantico, VA
NAS Pensacola, FL (NFO)
VMCJ-2 Cherry Point, NC
VMCJ Iwakuni Japan
VMCJ-2 Cherry Point
Released from Active duty October 1972
Completed studies in Theology
Ordained Minister, 1981
Currently pastoring in MA
1970 Married Harriett Babbitt (Mary Washington grad)
Daughter Becky is a nurse. 3 Grandkids.
Daughter Sarah is a medical secretary, Son Tim is a USAF Academy grad
Currently flight school, Whiting Field, FL
We live vicariously through our kids, now.
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Donald C. Bowles
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Frederick D. Bowles
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Thomas A. Brabec
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James L Brown
Hi All. After Basic School and Artillery School I shipped out to the 11th Marines in Danang and was assigned to Delta/1/1. as an F.O. Two months later I was wounded and recuperated in Guam for a couple of months. When I returned to Danang I was assigned to the CG's Staff at Camp Horn as a Protocol officer. Mostly I wrote itineraries and traveled around I Corp with celebrities. We went everywhere and saw everything. Best job of my life.
I finished my enlistment at Camp Pendleton where I was an battery exec.
Soon after, I married my college sweetheart Linda and we have raised three kids. They graduated from UCSB, UCSC and Chico State. My oldest son took over the family roofing business. Linda and I are still married and she is coming to the reunion too (go figure). Linda does custom upholstery and is not too interested in retiring like I am.
I am active in Veterans Affairs in San Diego. I recently finished a couple of years as President of the San Diego Veterans For Peace. I think we need to keep on serving and using our voice and experience as Veterans to look out for the next generation of Marines.

JL Brown on the left and Dwayne D. Clodfelter on the right in 1969

Linda and I as docents for the traveling vietnam wall in Oceanside Ca.

***************************************
Robert D. Brown
After Basic School I went to Ft. Sill to become a cannon cocker. Actually, I just wanted to be a Forward Observer, and I got my wish inRVN, with I Company 3/4, assigned out of I Battery 3/12, 3rd MarDiv. Tom Caruso, from our Basic School class, was in my company, and waslater killed. I was wounded twice on the same day in September, 1969. After I got out of the hospital, our Bn moved to Okinawa, with a coupleof months of training in Japan. My last year on active duty was at CampPendleton and at the District HQ San Francisco.In 1971 I returned to graduate school at Penn State on the G.I. Bill,finishing my Ph.D. in animal nutrition/physiology in 1975. I kept up myUSMCR points by helping with the NROTC Unit, taking correspondencecourses, and assisting the OSO when he came to campus. I worked at Texas A&I University in Kingsville from 1975-1987, teaching andconducting research on comparative wildlife nutrition (deer, javalina,exotic animals, and quail) and doing biomedical research for NIH, usingwildlife as models for human disease. My old OCS and Basic School mate,Larry Adkins, was I-I of C Company, 1/23 in Corpus Christi. I was Company Commander there for 3 years, then joined 4th Recon in SanAntonio as S-4, S-3, and X.O. In 1987 I became head of the Wildlife and Fisheries Department atMississippi State University. I commuted back to Texas to drill withthe Mobilization Unit in San Antonio and later was OIC of the unit inDallas. I was activated for 3 months during Operation Desert Storm. I also completed AWS, Command and Staff College, the Naval War College, and several other courses. In 1993 I returned to Texas as head of theDepartment of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences at Texas A&M University,and Director of the Institute of Renewable Natural Resources there. I retired as a Lt. Col. in 1993. In 1996 I became Dean of the College of Natural Resources at North Carolina State University. I was divorced in 1979 and remarried in 1981. My wife, Regan is a Nurse Practitioner, and we have hers, mine, and ours sons, Alex (32) in Singapore, Jason (32) inHouston, and Adam, 25 in Japan. So much for self aggrandizement. I suppose I'll have to retire sometime, but I have no such plans atpresent. As long as the work's fun and I can find a good deer hunting lease, life is good. Dr. Robert D. Brown DeanCollege of Natural Resources North Carolina State University 2028 Biltmore Hall Campus Box 8001 Raleigh, NC 27695-8001 USA Ph: 919-515-2883 (office) 919-515.7231 (fax) bob_brown@ncsu.edu

Bob on the Boat
Bob and Regan at the Reunion
*********************************************************
Joseph D. Buchholz

Attended University of New York at Buffalo 1965. Transferred to Canisius College (Eveneing Division) 66-67. Drafted Nov. 1967 - Enlisted USCM Dec 1967 MCRD Parris Island PLT222\52nd Special OC and TBS 4/69 Assigned 3rd Military Police Battalion DaNang - served as OIC Marine Security Detachment I Corps.
Rotated to Camp Lejeune served as Asst. S-4 3rd Bat 6th Marines -later served as Asst. Regimental S-4. Released active duty July 1971. Retired after 31 years Steamfitters Local #22 Buffalo, New York. Moved to Conway, SC October '03. My wife and I have three sons and 8 grandchildren.
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Richard C. Buettner
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Thomas K. Callanan
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Rodney L. Campbell
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Raymond W. Cassell, II
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Charles C. Chadwick, Jr.
Charlie at the Reunion
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Robert A. Cheever
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Edward H. Childress
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Michael C. Closz
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Harrison H. Conover
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Phillip A. Cowen
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Charles H. Cox, Jr.
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Allan J. Cunningham
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Robin W. Cushing
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Thomas R. Cushman
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Wayne L. Denley
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Andrew Scott Dudley
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James E. Fisher
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Donald L. Fogg, Jr.
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Rodney A. Ford
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Phillip Q. Foster
Born and raised in Tulsa, Oklahoma. I’ve been happily divorced for 25 years but compliment and congratulate those of you who have weathered your first and only marriage over the past 40 years. I have two children, Travis, 37 and Jennifer, 34.

I arrived at the 45th OCS class in August 1967. In the fifth week I broke a bone in my foot and remained in a casual company until October 1967. I began again in the 47th OCS. I was commissioned on January 5, 1968.

Arrived for flight school in late January 1968. I flew until early September when an inner ear condition prevented me from completing flight school. If you haven’t figured it our yet, I have terrible luck.

I returned to Quantico and began TBS with what can only be described as the wildest, craziest, most fun loving group of newly commissioned Second Lieutenants that have ever attended TBS. The enthusiasm, brotherhood and enjoyment I experienced with my comrades have never been forgotten. DILLIGAS was not just an expression; it was a fact.

After MOS training I arrived in RVN on May 5, 1969 as a First Lieutenant due to my time in flight school. Not having the FNG feeling was great. I was the battalion MTO for 9th Engineer Battalion, First Marines in Chu Lai. The majority of my time was spent leading supply convoys, two to three times a week from Chu Lai to Danang. During this time I received the Congressional Medal of BS from my Bn CO for my outstanding narrations and descriptions during porn movies.
My next and last duty station was as group MTO with MACG-38 at MCAS, El Toro. CA. I took an early out offer in December 1970 and ended my active duty service at El Toro.

Moving back to Tulsa, I remained in the local reserve unit as XO and then CO. I left Tulsa to work for Chrysler Motor Corporation as a technical training instructor in Kansas City in 1973.

I left Chrysler in 1979 starting my own repossession and investigation business in Tulsa. I sold this business in 1987 moving back to Pensacola where I went to work as the staff investigator for a four attorney, criminal defense law firm. I’m retired and retired stands for REALLY TIRED.

In conclusion, if you think this was my TMI ------ DILLIGAS? I do have a significant other, but I don’t intend to have her accompany me to the reunion. I know how you guys can behave, drunk or sober, plus, I’ve been told that Jim Fulks will be there too.

Semper FI
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Bill D. Franklin


L/Cpl Franklin Capt Franklin

Born Waco, Texas, 24 September 1946. Grew up in Bremond, Barbers Hill, Rockdale, Point Comfort and Port Lavaca, Texas, Perth, Western Australia, and Pittsburgh, PA. Graduated from Chartiers Valley High School in Pittsburgh in 1965 and went to Penn State University for two terms until transferred to Parris Island for rehab.Active Duty Marine Corps Career:
April 1966 to June 1966: Platoon 176 MCRD Parris Island, SC
June 1966 to July1966: IRT, Camp Geiger, NC
July 1966 to December 1966: AE(A) School, NAS JAX
December 1966 to July 1968: VMCJ-2, MCAS Cherry Point, NC
July 1968 to October 1968: 52nd Special OCC, Quantico, VA
October 1968 to March 1969: The Basic School Class 4-69, Quantico, VA
March 1969 to April 1969: MCSSS, Camp Lejeune, NC
May 1969 to October 1969: Platoon Commander 9th MT Bn, Dong Ha
October 1969 to February 1970: Bn MT Officer, 3Bn 5th Marines, An Hoa
February 1970 to May 1970: MT Officer 26th Marines, Da Nang
May 1970 to October 1970: MT Officer 2nd Bn 5th Marines, Camp Pendleton, CA
November 1970 to May 1971: VT-10, NAS Pensacola
May 1971 to June 1971: VT-86, NAS Glynco, GA
July 1971 to September 1972: Squadron B/N, VMAT-202, MCAS Cherry Point, NC
September 1972 to February 1973: Squadron B/N, VMA-332, MCAS, Cherry Point, NC
February 1973 to July 1974: Group Training Officer, MAG-14, MCAS Cherry Point, NC
and THEN
Jul 1974 to Feb 1976: Sales Representative, Dictaphone Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA.
Feb 1976 to Aug 1981: Air Traffic Controller, FAA, Washington ARTCC, Leesburg, VA. Aug 1981 to Jan 1986: Full-time student at Seminole Community College and the University of Central Florida working full-time as a photographer at Walt Disney World. Graduated from the University of Central Florida with a BA in Education in 1985. Jan 1986 to Sep 1991: Education Specialist, Naval Air Warfare Center, Training Systems Division, Orlando, FL. Graduated from the University of Central Florida with a Master’s Degree in Instructional Technology in 1987. Sep 1991 to Jul 1997: Aviation Project Manager, Naval Air Warfare Center, Training Systems Division, Orlando FL. Graduated from Defense Systems Management College Advanced Program Managers Course 1996. Jul 1997 to Jul 2007: Assistant Program Manager for Training Systems, Marine Corps Systems Command, Program Manager for Training Systems, Orlando FL. Highest Civil Service Rank was GS-15. Awarded the Commendation for Meritorious Civilian Service Medal in 2007.Jun 2007: Retirement flag flown at 1st Recruit Training Battalion, Parris Island, SC marking 35 years of combined active duty and civil service. Jul 2007 to 2010: Research Scientist, University of Central Florida, College of Optics and Photonics, Orlando, FL. Supporting DARPA, ONR, ARL, NRL, AFRL, and the Marine Corps Warfighting Lab.  2010-Present:  Volunteer at Valiant Air Command Warbird Museum in Titusville FL 2010-2013.  Now retired.
Active memeber of the Marine Corps Mustnag Association, Marinc Corps Aviation Association, Central Florida Marine Corps Foundation and UCF Alumni Association and the Order of Daedallion.  Married to Sharon (Corky) Franklin. Corky recently retired from Raytheon Corporation where she supported live, virtual and constructive training for the US Army. Corky and I have four grown children and 7 Grandchildren. Corky and I live in Roswell GA.
  



Bill and Corky at USMC Ball 2012



Bill and Corky at the 40th Reunion
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Warren Todd Frommelt

A New Jersey boy to start. After some college, enlisted in the Marine Corps at age 20, and went active at Parris Island in May 1967. Fully intended to be a grunt but ended up serving 1 ½ years in sea duty before orders to the 52nd Special OCS pulled me off the ship in the Gulf of Tonkin. Out of Basic School received orders to flight school, slipped into A-4’s and loved the next almost 20 years of flying them all over, but mostly West Coast and 3rd and 1st MAWs. Ended up as a Lt Col and executive officer of the VMA-214 Blacksheep. Retired with just over 21 years of service.

After spending the last couple of years trying to talk junior officers out of bailing out to go with the airlines, decided why not…and spent my second career with TWA and American Airlines in the L-1011 and MD-80, retiring again in June 2005.

Lovely wife Jeanne (second marriage for us both) and I reside in the San Diego area and we both bring two kiddos into the mix, ages 37-41. But we’re not that old, just early starters. And so far, we’re blessed with 4 fine Grandsons.

Hun and Jeanne
Hun the Aviator
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James A. Fulks

COLONEL JAMES A. FULKS
CO, 4th Marines (TF Grizzly)With his staff
Colonel Fulks was born October 3, 1946 and raised in Great Falls, Montana.
He attended Great Falls High School graduating in 1964 and attended Utah State University for three years before enlisting in the Marine Corps in April 1967. He served as a helicopter crew member in HMH-462 attaining the rank of sergeant prior to attending the 52nd Special Officers Candidate Class.

After completing Officer Candidate School, he was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps Reserve. After OCS and completing instruction at the Basic School in Quantico, Virginia, he was assigned to the 1st Marine Division in the Republic of Vietnam where he served as a rifle platoon commander, rifle company commander, and the S-2 Intelligence Officer for 1st Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment.

Upon returning to the United States and while assigned as the Military Training Platoon Commander for the Field Medical Service School at Camp Pendleton, California, he augmented into the regular establishment in July 1971. Promoted to Captain in July 1972, he returned to Utah State University completing his Bachelor of Science degree in Geography and was subsequently assigned to the Marine Corps Recruit Depot in Parris Island, South Carolina. While at the Recruit Depot he served as a Series Commander and Recruit Company Commander. In 1975, he was transferred to Quantico, Virginia to attend the Marine Corps' Amphibious Warfare School.

Following graduation, he reported to the 3rd Marine Division in Okinawa, Japan serving as a rifle company commander and the S-3 Operations Officer for the 1st Battalion, 9th Marine Regiment. In 1977, he was assigned to Marine Corps Recruiting Station, Denver, Colorado. He was promoted to major while serving in Denver as the Officer Selection Officer.

In 1980, Colonel Fulks attended Naval Command and Staff College in Newport, Rhode Island and was then assigned to the Marine Barracks, Bermuda as the Commanding Officer. Upon completion of that assignment, he was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel and transferred to Headquarters, U.S. Marine Corps in Washington, D.C. serving as the Program Development Officer for the Deputy Chief of Staff for Requirements and Programs.

In 1987, he was a student at the Air War College (AWC), Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama. While attending the AWC, he completed the requirements for his Master of Science degree in International Affairs from Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York. Upon graduation from AWC, he was assigned to the Command Element for the III Marine Expeditionary Force in Okinawa, Japan where he served as the G-3 Operations Officer.

Returning to the United States, he rejoined the 1st Marine Division at Camp Pendleton, California and served as the G-3 Operations Officer. In August 1990, he was promoted to Colonel and had assumed duties as the Assistant Chief of Staff G-3 (Operations and Training) when the 1st Marine Division deployed to Saudi Arabia for Operation Desert Shield. In January 1991, he was assigned as the Commanding Officer of the 4th Marine Regiment. The 4th Marine Regiment was assigned to the 1st Maine Division during Operation Desert Storm. Redesignated Task Force Grizzly, the 4th Marine Regiment infiltrated into Kuwait three days prior to the launching of the ground attack in Kuwait during the Persian Gulf War.

Upon returning to the United States in May 1991, Colonel Fulks assumed command of the 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division at Camp Pendleton, California. In July 1993, he was reassigned to the Marine Corps Combat Development Command and assumed duties as the Director, Marine Air Ground Task Force Staff Training Center, Training and Education Division, Marine Corps Combat Development Command in Quantico, Virginia.

Colonel Fulks retired from active duty in July of 1994 and started work as the Corporate Director of Human Resources for Evans Hotels in San Diego, California. Evans Hotels is a family business that owns and operates the Bahia Hotel, Catamaran Resort Hotel, and the Lodge at Torrey Pines in San Diego and the Newport Dunes Resort and Marina in Newport Beach, California. In June 2004, Colonel Fulks left Evans Hotels and moved to Baltimore to assist the development of Under Armour, Inc., a company co-founded by his son, Kip. He worked until July 2007 as the Corporate Director of Human Resources.

His personal decorations include the Legion of Merit with Combat Distinguishing Device and Gold Star, the Meritorious Service Medal, the Navy Commendation Medal, the Navy Achievement Medal, and the Combat Action Ribbon with Gold Star.

Colonel Fulks currently lives in Steamboat Springs, CO where he spends his time as a fly fishing guide in the summer and ski instructor for the Steamboat Ski Resort in the winter. He is married to the former Kimberly Evans, of Bloomsburg, PA and has a daughter Kim and two sons, Kip and Koby.
2nd Lt Fulks at Quantico
Jim with his pet fish
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Robert J. Garner
Bob and Pattie at the Reunion
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Robert S. Gilliam III
Autobiographical Sketch
of
Robert S. Gilliam III
for his
TBS 469 40th Reunion
In the fall of 1966, having completed 3 years of an accelerated premedical program in 2 years, I realized that my grades at Hamilton College, Clinton, NY would never get me into Harvard Medical School. Knowing that once I withdrew I’d loose my 2-S deferment, I decided to enlist in the USMC, after all my
parents were part of Tom Brokaw’s greatest generation, and I was raised by a graduate of VMI to believe military service was a rite of manhood.
When I stepped off the bus onto those yellow footprints painted on the sidewalk at MCRD Parris Island, SC, I remembered my father’s admonition “Keep your mouth shut, don’t volunteer for anything else, listen to your drill instructors, and you may survive Viet Nam”. He didn’t attend my graduation from PI, although my mother and sister did, and that bothered me; even though having been a US Army LtCol on General McArthur’s staff in WWII, he did concede he regretted he hadn’t served as a Marine.
After PI and Camp LeJeune, I attended aviation ordnance school at NAS Jacksonville and was subsequently assigned to my first real duty station at MAG 32 in Beaufort, SC. From there I applied through the Enlisted Commissioning Program to attend OCS, Quantico, VA, hoping to appease my father who was still very disappointed I hadn’t first earned my bachelor’s degree. BTW, life in
Jacksonville and Beaufort was as good as or better than the Alpha Delta Phi fraternity party life at Hamilton College. I received an Honorable Discharge as a Corporal, and simultaneously reported to OCS.
My father did show up for graduation from OCS, and his enthusiastic congratulations relieved me. After TBS, it was off to Vietnamese Language School at Quantico and then, of course, to Viet Nam where I was initially assigned as 1st Platoon Cdr Fox 2/4 in northern I Corps on May 31, 1969, my 23rd birthday. Rob
Mitchell became our FO in July, but at the time I didn’t realize he’d trained with me in TBS 469. My company was redeployed to Okinawa on November 10, 1969 (!) after I’d been in country for less than 6 months. What a break! I hear Mitchell’s battery stayed on for a couple more weeks. I got back home to Nyack, NY in June 1970, and my family had a big ‘Welcome Home’ banner strung above the driveway; but my real celebration was with my best friend and next door neighbor who’d
avoided the whole thing as a genuine conscientious objector, and we’re still best friends in spite of our past political differences. After a month’s leave, I reported to MCSA Philadelphia, PA where I became Aide-de Camp to its two star commanding general. This was really great duty, and since it was close to
home, I was able to rekindle a teenage flame with Erica, now my wife of 37 years.
Following my discharge from active duty as a 1st Lieutenant, I completed my bachelor’s degree in 1973 with a change of majors to economics, financed largely by the GI Bill, at Columbia University’s School of General Studies. Believe me, it was not easy being a veteran among all those pinko hippies in those days.
The good news was that Bankers Trust Company in New York City, now Deutsche Bank, had a quota for veterans. In 1978, I moved to Irving Trust Company on Wall Street. Then in 1990, two years after its hostile takeover by The Bank of New York, now BNY Mellon Bank, I was able to pull a parachute at the last minute; but unfortunately there were 120,000 other unemployed bankers in metropolitan New York, and I remained unemployed for 14 months before joining Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company as a salesman.
I retired from Northwestern Mutual in 2001 at age 55, returned to Richmond, VA where I was born, and built our dream home for which I was general contractor. Following that 5 year ordeal, I’ve been playing golf several times weekly and singing in a barbershop chorus. Life is good. We have two children and a grand child. Ironically, our daughter is named Margot, like the LZ my platoon built in RVN, and our son’s nick name is Rob, as in our FO, Rob Mitchell, a nick
name I’d always preferred. I regret my parents didn’t live long enough to witness all this and more importantly to watch our children mature into fine, mature, and responsible young adults. However, I do not regret taking a break from college in 1966.
The Marine Corps was probably the best thing that ever happened to me, and I do
believe my life would never have turned out so well had it not been for my tours with it. In 1972, I was belatedly awarded a Bonze Star with Combat “V” and was discharged from the inactive reserves as a Captain in 1973. These are my two greatest achievements.
Pvt Gilliam / 1stLt Gilliam / Bob Gilliam 2000


Gilliam Family 2006 Barbershopper 2007

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Robert W. Graham
Almost 40 years later, I find myself marked as one of the “UNK”’s in Co F, 2nd Platoon photo, although for the life of me I couldn’t tell you which one I am…...I suspect one of the skinny green ones.

After graduation from 52nd OCC, having just rotated stateside less than 1 year from a tour in I Corps as LCpl in AmTracs (remember those ?) to attend TBS, I was stationed at Camp Pendleton as a training officer at ITR for Marines coming out of MCRD San Diego. Later sent to JAG school, I played military lawyer at Pendleton until my discharge in 1971, having never gone back to RVN. Married Tisha Andres, love of my life and sometimes faithful arranger of blind dates for fellow Marines at Dunbarton College in Washington D.C.( I know some of you remember those ) in July, 1969. Older, grayer, perhaps a little wiser, we still both recall those times at TBS Quantico and 52nd Special (were we ever) OCS and the friends we made there when “we were warriors once, and young” as some of the most memorable in our lives.

After leaving CA in 1971, we moved back to the Washington D.C. area where I attended Georgetown University (my greatest accomplishment while there being a walk-on role in the opening crowd scene of “The Exorcist” when it was filmed on campus), graduating in ‘74. Worked for several years in D.C.on “the Hill” for various trade/professional associations (say “lobbyist” if you must) before moving to Atlanta in 1980 as state Ex.Dir. for a natl. construction industry assn .Eventually deciding to make an honest living, I moved into the private sector in 1988 and 20 years later find myself as vp & director of food & consumer products group with The Austin Co., spending my time traveling the earth putting together the pieces for the design and construction of manufacturing plants for the likes of clients such as Colgate, General Mills, etc .No heavy lifting or working outdoors in the rain required, so all things considered, life has been good to us.

Blessed with 2 wonderful daughters - Jennifer, with grandchildren Jake and Zoe living here in Atlanta and youngest Jessica ,a forensic psychologist living in D.C. with dog, cat and steady boyfriend in, dear God, the Coast Guard, (yes, I know-it’s painful to me too) we still live in Marietta, Ga. outside Atlanta and split our time between here and a beach shack in Cape Fear NC, where I hope to eventually end my days building small classic wood boats when I’m not busy decimating the local blue crab and game fish populations. Tisha retires this year after 25 years of teaching 4th graders how to be good citizens in 5th grade and beyond, and we’re looking forward to slowing down a bit, seeing a little more of the world before we leave it, and as many of you, my brothers, as I can recognize when we meet again in June.

Semper Fi

Bob.


Bob and Tisha at the reunion

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Michael S. Gray
Michael S. GRAY, LTCOL USMC R Ret.

I was born in Montana, attended H.S. & College (BA in Geology) in Southern California. I entered the PLC program in August 1965. In 1 week during September 1968; I graduated College, Commissioned in the Marine Corps and married my High School Sweetheart, Judie GRAY.

I have a Combat Engineer MOS but have served in various capacities outside the field. In May 1969, I reported into RVN and served with 11th Engineers in Cua Viet, Camp Hansen, Okinawa and Camp Fuji, Japan. Subsequent to a race riot, I was reassigned from Camp Fuji to become the XO, Service Company, HQTRS BN, 3rd MarDiv at Camp Courtney, Okinawa. After completing my WestPac tour, I went to 2nd Engineers and immediately volunteered to take a Med.‘float’ platoon with BLT 3/8.

Upon returning from the ‘float’, I was offered an early out. Luckily, I obtained a job as a Criminal Investigator for the Bureau of Narcotics Dangerous Drugs (BNDD). The condition of employment was that I agree to work narcotics in New York City. I completed Basic Agent training in the late fall of 1971. Over the next 26 years, BNDD became Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) while I worked cases in and out of CONUS as undercover, case agent, & supervisor.

In 1974, my wife and I formed a Subchapter S Corporation and began buying NJ area houses to repair, rent and ultimately sell. At about the same time, I returned to USMC R. Other than going on active duty for schools or as an instructor for reserves during summers, my USMC R career was mostly as a member of VTUs or MTUs.

In 1991, I was involuntarily mobilized for 8 months in support of Desert Shield/Desert Storm, assigned to Family Programs at HQMC, Navy Annex, Arlington, VA. Upon completion of Active Duty, I submitted my USMC retirement papers in 1993. Subsequently, returned to the DEA as supervisor of the interdiction group responsible for Dulles & Washington National Airports. I retired from DEA in 1997.

In 1997, I purchased some land in North Pole, Alaska (15 miles S. of Fairbanks), where we have been doing some land clearing along a slow moving stream, in preparation for our ‘some day’ structure. Besides dabbling in the stock market, I have been trying to keep up with my Bride, Judie, who retired as an Adult & Geriatric Nurse Practitioner in July, 2006. We have a married 36 YOA son – Douglas and our 4th English Bulldog – Hercules Playdough (nom de guerre: Brains). E-mail: bulldog5500@verizon.net

Semper Fi
Burke, VA.
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Thomas Mike Gresham
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William H. Gross
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Richard T. Gunter
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Thomas Bruce Hanley
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George E. Halloran
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Mason D. Harrell, Jr.
After 3 years as a logistics officer in the USMC, I attended Law School at the University of Texas, obtaining a Juris Doctor degree in 1973. Worked as an attorney in Washington, D.C., for the General Counsel of the U.S. Postal Service from 1973 till 1987. Became a U.S. Administrative Law Judge in 1987. In 1995 became Chief Judge in San Bernardino, CA. From 1972 to 2000, served in the USMC Reserves in a Recon Batallion, as an Intel officer, JAG, culminating in assignment as Total Quality Manager and Process Improvement Advisor to the Commanding General, U.S. Marine Forces, Pacific, Camp Smith, HI. Camille, my wife or 40 years, and I have raised 7 kids. We just got rid of the last one a couple of years ago, so we try to spend lots of weekends flying Space A all over the world - Japan, Korea, Germany etc. Only 1 son, Mason D. Harrell, III, is in the military - a Navy doctor.
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Richard G. Hill
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Charles R. Hostutler
Left The American University in January 1968, after 2 1/2 fruitless years, for a two year enlistment. Joined Platoon 119 at Parris Island and graduated in April. After ITR and BST (1311) was placed in Casual Company awaiting orders to OCS and the 52nd Special OC Class.

After OCS, TBS and Engineer School reported to 3rd MarDiv RVN (Buddy Cheever and Mike Gray reported in with me) in May 1969. Assigned as a platoon commander with 3rd Bridge Co.,11th Engr. Bn. subsequently assigned to 1st Bridge Co.,7th Engr. Bn. after half of 3rd Brdge returned to Okinawa in October 1969 (Buddy Cheever relieved me while I attended Embark School in preparation for our return from RVN). Left RVN by ship in March 1970 with remnants of 3rd Bridge Co. Arrived Camp Pendleton on Easter Sunday 1970.

Initially assigned to 8th Engr. Bn. Camp Lejeune and subsequently sent to Naval Justice School in Newport, R.I. where I met my bride, Sharon. Spent my last year on active duty as a Special Court Martial trial counsel at Force Troops, Camp Lejeune where I had the distinction of prosecuting my boot camp bunky. Released from active duty on October 1, 1971.

Had a number of great experiences in the reserve both as part of the organized reserve and IRR. Was a platoon commander and, later, OIC Det/XO of E Co. 2/25.
Three different assignments with the Seabees as Military Advisor to 8th RNCR, 21stRNCR and Director of Military Training for the Naval Civil Engineer Corps Officers School. They wanted a Marine but he had to be a reserve for fear that a full timer would take over the school.

Participated in a number of war games at the Armed Forces Staff College in Norfolk, VA, playing OPFOR for the students final exam. Augmented the FMFEUR staff in London for NATO exercises in 1987 and 1989. Was slated to take part in 1991 but Saddam forced cancellation of the exercise.

Retired from the USMCR as a Lt. Col. in February 1994.

In real life I served as a trial court administrator for 12 years (Court of Common Pleas of Chester County, PA) and statewide intermediate appellate court administrator ( Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania) for 22 years from which I retired at the end of 2006.

Spent the winter of 2007 skiing in Vermont (mostly). Got in 70 days; not bad for an old guy. I spend the off season on my bicycle and helping Sharon take care of our 3 year old granddaughter. Life is good. Sharon and I have almost 37 years together, two great kids with wonderful spouses and two grandchildren to keep us feeling young or exhausted depending on the time of day. And, I have memories of people like you to remind me of what a great ride this has been. God willing, see you in June.

Chip Hostutler: Christmas day 1969 Camp Eagle
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Stephen T. Houck
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Edward F. Houff
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James R. Huovinen
Just reviewed (Jan. 2011) the 4-69 roster and noted some pretty impressive accomplishments regarding former classmates- I met some of them at ATD's and schools from 1971-1992 while in the reserves. After serving with 11th Engineers in RVN and Okinawa we had a nice tour at Camp Pendleton and left active duty in July 1971 to attend graduate school in upper Michigan. After getting a Masters we eased down to "Troll Land" (below the Mackinac Bridge) to teach at Midland High while, in addition, coaching cross country and track. Midland is the home of Dow Chemical and loaded with scientists so it was a great place to work- the parents cared. I was the C.O. of "C" Company 1/24, 4th MarDiv. in Lansing and later, S-2 and S-3 with H & S 1/24 in Detroit. Charlie Company was full of college students(MSU) and auto workers(Olds) -an interesting combination; we enjoyed some "cool" winter (Jan.) ATD's in Alaska and Norway attached to Army and Norwegian battalions. I attended the normal run of schools culminating with the National War College in 1992- had not applied for it and was Class III by that time. After a decade in the grunts I got real lucky and switched to Marine Wing Support Group -47 at Selfridge Air National Guard Base and served in the S-3 and S-4 billets with the Group. I learned what the term "swing with the wing" meant and, strangely, did not miss the alkali dust at 29 Palms nor sled -dogging Akios on the Alaskan pipeline. Like a number of you, I gained some great friends while on active duty and in the reserves. I retired in 1992 as an 0-6 after the C. Robb/ Tailhook fiascoes- enough was enough.As a result of a 2005 fishing trip to the Upper Peninsula, we ended up purchasing a summer home in Eagle River on the shores of Lake Superior. In 2007 we sold our home in Midland county and moved up to the Keweenaw full time (adding on to house the next year). Our winter population is about twenty and in the summer we "balloon up" to fifty. White tail deer outnumber voters 8-1; cougars, wolves and coyotes cull the deer herd. The local sportsmen's club feeds twenty four tons of pellets to keep the herd healthy so there's something to shoot during deer season-hmmmmm. 50-60 deer mill-drill in our back yard every day. Annual snowfall averages about 250-300 inches/ winter lasts from November-April. Large 2-stage snow throwers and snow mobiles are in household T/E's. Summers are absolutely wonderful with plenty of brook trout streams and lakes for walleye, pike, bass and pan fish. I've started playing hockey again with a Michigan Tech professor's team which is a bit of a challenge since most of them are in the 35-45 range. Cross country skiing is also enjoyable. Our son, born in Quantico, is a Michigan State trooper and our daughter works in Dallas- we plan on "fluttering south" later this winter to flock with the other snow birds. I was unaware of the reunions nor of this site until receiving an email from Bill. I looked at the pictures and only recognized Mike Jaskilka but, hey, 42 years and weakening eyes could be a good reason too. If any of you are in the area give me a call.
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Michael C. Jaskilka



Top Picture: Jan Jaskilka at the Reunion


Bottom Picture: Mike Jaskilka and Franklin at the Memorial service for TBS 4/69 KIAs at the Marine Corps Museum.

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Dozier W. Jones, Jr.
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Ronald L. Jones
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Grover R. Klemmer
I married Sandra Morris (Mary Washington College) on March 6, 1969 in Fredericksburg Virginia with John Korneder acting as Best Man, Steve Marquis as Groomsman, and Frank Main as Photographer. The following day, Sandi and I traveled to the west coast and began duty that included assistant to the OSO in San Francisco, platoon commander in the 5th Tank Battalion (Camp Pendleton), and company commander in the 3d Tank Battalion (Okinawa). After 6 years, and a tour of duty as Marine Corps Track Coach (Quantico), I left active duty to attend Law School at the University of San Francisco. After graduation, I joined the Alameda County District Attorney’s Office (California) as a Deputy District Attorney doing criminal prosecution trial work. I am currently an Assistant District Attorney assigned to supervision of operations for the southern half of Alameda County. I stayed in the reserves until retirement as a colonel in 1998. During that time I served in various assignments including Commanding Officer 1/14, and Executive Officer 23d Marines. I was returned to active duty twice serving as the Chief of Staff, Ground Combat Element, V MEF (Desert Shield) and as a staff officer to the U.S. Military Representative to NATO (Bosnia). Sandi is a realtor, and we have 4 children, 4 grandchildren and a fifth grandchild on the way.
Klemmer Family
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John H. Korneder
I retired as a Colonel in 1996 on just under 30 years of service since my enlisted time also counted for retirement. I spent the last third of my career as a Program Manager: PLRS w/the Army at Ft Monmouth, PM for Ground & Combat Service Support Command & Control at Marine Corps Systems Command, Top Level School at the National Defense College in New Delhi, India and then finally Ass't PEO for Ops & Mgt w/PEO Minewarfare.

I taught a little college but then got a little crazy and spent the last 18 months in Kabul, Afghanistan with a company called MPRI as the advisor to the Assistant Minister of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics, and the Director of the Acquisition Agency trying to help them get their acquisition and contracting systems on line.

Married: 4 children and 5 grandchildren. I will be attending w/my wife, Maj Toni Korneder, USMC (ret).
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Frank L. Kocevar
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Charles R Kozak
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David R. Kuney
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Warren Kurtz, Jr.
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Steve D. Langhoff
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Charles F. Laughinghouse
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Ritter E. Lemke
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Hale W. Lentz
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John J. Lynch
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Dennis E. Maach
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Robert V. Macaluso
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Steve M. Marquis
After leaving the Corps I finished undergraduate studies at Indiana, worked for a couple of years for IBM, then returned to Indiana for an MBA in Finance. I worked in several aspects of the financial services industry until I retired here in 2000. I've lived on this five acres of land situated on the side of Hualalai Mountain on the Big Island of Hawaii since 1999. Google Earth has a nice picture of the small spread. It would certainly be a pleasure to greet any former classmate headed this way. If anyone would like pictures I'd be happy to send them. Semper Fi from an old truck driver.
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Herbert A. McDaniel
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Sidney E. McLaughlin
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Michael J. Maehl
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Frank O. Main
Frank Main at the Reunion
Frank and Mary Main at the Reunion
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Larry D. McCauley
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James R. McNeece
A bit of a bring-up on my life after TBS, I went to Air Force pilot training in Alabama, was married, then to Yuma for training in the A-4. Wound up in Iwakuni in early 1972, just in time to deploy with VMA-311 to Bien Hoa Air Base just north of Saigon after the NVA's An Loc offensive started. Flew air support missions out of there until the Paris peace talks concluded. I led the next to last flight of Skyhawks out of RVN the day after the 1973 cease fire. The last flight followed 10 minutes later. I assume they turned out the lights before they left. After that, Pat and I went to the Naval Academy where I taught physics and Pat gave birth to our two daughters. Needless to say, we consider that tour to be a highlight. AWS was followed by squadron tours on the west coast and West Pac, then back to HQMC for a super tour (believe it or not!) and retirement in 1987. Since then, I have worked in the defense industry (i.e., Beltway Bandit), small business finance, and done volunteer work. We have two grandchildren. Our youngest daughter is to be married soon so there may be more. Stay tuned!
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John E. Martinelli
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Gregory E. Melnick, Jr.
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James M. Messer
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Charles E. Michaels
After TBS, assigned to E 2/9 operating out of Vandegrift and Quang Tri. When 9th Marines stood down, assigned as security officer and company commander of 3rd Med Bn in Quang Tri, eventually leaving for Okinawa on the USS Odgen on Thanksgiving Day 1969 when 3rd MARDIV pulled out. Served as company commander of B 9th MT Bn at Camp Pendleton before being assigned as OSO in Austin, Texas.

OSO was great duty, traveling around Texas college campuses, eating, drinking and talking about the Corps, all at government expense. Subsequently went to Vanderbilt Law School, where I served as CO of the local reserve company in Nashville. Held a series of assignments in the reserves including, company commander with 2/23, Det commander of 3rd CAG, in the G-3 with 2nd MEB and I MEF at Camp Pendleton, and OIC of dets at MCAGCC, 29 Palms and El Toro.

Attended standard Marine courses in addition to a number of great joint schools, including the Naval Justice School, Armed Forces Staff College, and Army War College. Retired in 1998 as a Colonel; personal decorations include the Legion of Merit, Meritorious Service Medal, Navy Commendation, VCG w/bronze star, Army Achievement Medal, and Combat Action Ribbon.

In civilian life, I’ve been a corporate attorney for almost my entire career, and for the past 18 years I have been the general counsel of a Los Angeles based real estate company. Have been active in local professional bars and recently completed a term as president of the LA County Bar Association.

Met my wife on R&R when she was with American Airlines. Mariann is “retired” and she commutes between our homes in Orange County, San Francisco and Phoenix, where she spends time with our kids, Charliana, who lives in the Bay Area, and our older daughter, Christina and our folks, all of whom now live in the greater Phoenix area. Both Mariann and Charli, my younger daughter, will be coming back to the reunion.

Mariann’s hobby is traveling and she wants me to retire, but my hobby is working…and I really enjoy what I do…my company owns a yacht club and the LA Athletic Club, so we’ve got some great fringe benefits, so why retire? Life has been really good to us. Let’s not mess up a good deal.

The early days in the Corps were rough, but I learned a lot about life; the times were exciting and I had the opportunity to serve with some great Marines along the way. I hope everyone is healthy and well. Looking forward to catching up after 40 years.

Semper Fi,
Charley


Charley (left) at the Reunion
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Charles B. Milligan
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Robert B. Mitchell
I grew up on Long Island, New York just outside of NYC but knew I wanted to go south to school. Began at Georgia Tech in the Fall of 1964. Enrolled in the PLC program in 1966 and went to Camp Upshur in the summer of 1966 for PLC Junior and to Chopawamsic in 1967 for PLC Sr. Graduated from GT in August of 1968 and theoretically was commissioned, because there was no ceremony. Showed up for TBS 4-69 on Friday, Oct. 4th with Mike Jaskilka. They told us to get lost until 0600 Monday morning and to report in to Upshur. I was in the same squad bay, about 4 racks away from where I had been as a private.

At TBS I remember spending a lot of time in the Hawkins Room; learning how to play poker from Jim Peddy and Bill Reilly; and mastering the art of using the “F” word as a noun, verb, adjective, adverb, conjuction from our Plt Commander, Lt. Fahey. I enjoyed land navigation the most.

From TBS we went to Ft. Sill for 3 months. That was a great school which I enjoyed. On July 4th, about 6 of us left Travis AFB at 0600. I remember as I was on the top of the stairs boarding the plane, they were raising the flag. Got into country on July 7th and 3 days later I was with Fox Co. 2/4 (The Magnificent Bastards) as the FO. At that time we were the end of the line, no friendlies to the North or West. For the next 5 months we operated all over Northern I Corps. Although I bitched a lot, I wouldn’t trade that experience for anything. In mid November, 2/4 stood down (the last unit of the 3rdMar Div to do so) and I went back to my battery, Hotel 3/12.

We left Vietnam on Thanksgiving night for what was supposed to be a 3 day trip to Okinawa. 9 days later, after almost sinking in the South China Sea , we arrived in Okinawa. I thought I had died and gone to heaven. Okinawa fit me just right and I had a great time. In March, Hotel 3/12 became part of BLT 2/4 and by this time I was the battery Fire Direction Officer. We went to the Philippines (even better than Okinawa), Hong Kong, and spent a lot of time making a wake off of the coast of VN. In May, 1970 when the Army invaded Cambodia, we were all set to make an amphib landing at the DMZ. Rotated back to Quantico in July, 1970 and was with the Artillery Demonstration Battery. In addition to doing twice monthly shoots for TBS we got to defend the bridges of D.C. in the May, 1971 Peace riots.

Took the early out and went to work for Gulf Oil in 1971. Was all over the Southeast including a stint in Orlando where I got my MBA from Rollins College. After 10 years , moved myself from Houston, TX to Jacksonville, FL to work for Merrill Lynch. Have been with ML ever since as a Financial Advisor. Married in 1978; have 3 grown sons; Zach, Mac and Sammy Jack. Divorced in 2007. Enjoy reading history; golf; travel and bird hunting. I have spent way too much time thinking about my Marine Corps experiences, but I wouldn’t trade that time for anything. Proud to have the Combat Action Ribbon and Navy Commendation with “v”.
Robb Mitchell 1969 FSB Russell RVN
Cover of the Gazette


Robb married Pam in April 2010. They both look forward to the next reunion!!

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Kieth D. Moore
I was delighted when Ron Jones took it upon himself to move somebody off the “lost list”, found me, and told me about the reunion. I’m really looking forward to seeing you guys!

After TBS and Vietnamese language training, I served as platoon commander and later company commander of H/2/4 (mostly operating between Dong Ha and the DMZ). I think I really changed a lot during my time as a platoon and company commander, and it has clearly shaped the rest of my life.
My last duty station was Twenty Nine Palms. (I guess that’s what happens when you request Treasure Island, Alameda and San Diego!) After that, I got a masters degree in City and Regional Planning at Harvard (which I have never quite fully used).
After grad school, Sara and I moved to Denver. Sara and I got divorced after 13 years; she is re-married and happily situated in Austin.
I was married to Anne for 23 years and we are now divorced. She is a pediatrician and a horse addict. We live on a horse farm southeast of Denver. I have two daughters, a son, and two granddaughters.
I’ve spent most of my career in consulting and have had a great time. I get to work with mostly smart people trying to do mostly important things. I try to help them, and then I take what I’ve learned and try to help other mostly smart people do other mostly important things. Over the years, my work has focused on rapid growth communities, finance, telecommunications and health care. I also write a good bit and have co-authored several books. I’m now chairman and CEO of McManis Consulting, which has offices in Denver, Washington, and Dallas.
I’ve been thinking recently about retiring at some point. Frankly, it scares me, and I have no idea what life will be like in another ten years. (If you have any useful advice, please “counsel” me.)
Best wishes always, Keith
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Charles H. Moses
It was either OCS or Parris Island for me when I signed on April 1, 1968,
and either 3 years as an officer or 2 years as a non-com in a platoon. The
determining factor was - would I pass the Alabama Bar exam that I had
taken in February 1968, after graduating from the University of Alabama
Law School in January 1968. I thought I might claim the contract with
the Marine Corps was void as just an April fools joke if I didn’t pass! I
did pass and entered OCS at Camp Upshur. I had been to Parris Island as
a boy scout, so I was not surprised by Upshur (but I was sure appreciative
that our class had so many experienced members who knew the basic things of what was
expected of us). After OCS and TBS John Newhard and I had to go to Camp Pendleton (while
the other lawyers in the class went to New Port, RI) for Naval Justice School. After a month off
on graduating from Naval Justice School, I headed for Westpac (that was all my orders said - but
I was told I was a by-name replacement for an attorney at 9th MAB on Okinawa who wanted to
go to Vietnam for the remainder of his tour). 9th MAB had responsibility for the perimeter
positions around DaNang and aboard ship, but legal was stationed on Okinawa - meaning there
was substantial time lost in travel back and forth. After 6 months with 9th MAB I requested, like
my predecessor, assignment in country. I arrived on the Marine Corps birthday 1969 in DaNang
to join 1st Marine Air Wing. I handled cases all over Vietnam, finishing over 100 cases during
my tour and was awarded a Navy Commendation with combat “v”. Since I had “volunteered”
out of TBS (being single) to go to Westpac, in exchange for a West coast assignment on return,
my orders were to Base Command at Camp Lejeune, where I reported in May 1970. I tried to get them changed to Navy Appellate Review Activity in DC, but the general then heading SJA
Division would only agree if I would up my tour of duty. I was sent to the University of Virginia
to attend the Army Military Judge Course and on graduation, sat as Military Judge in Special
Courts Martial for 150 cases in 6 months. The last three months of my tour, I ran an
administrative law office for the Base Command with one other attorney and two clerks. We
wrote something for over 250 clients per week. It was an impressive education for private
practice. Having married a 1st Lieutenant in December 1970 (divorced in 1984), I continued my
plans to move to private practice in Birmingham, Alabama, my home. I joined a firm of three
lawyers as the fourth and became a partner after 6 months and managed that firm for 16 years. I moved from there to a firm needing a business practice to add to their litigation practice. I grew that firm’s business practice to 9 lawyers and the firm grew to 50 from 20. After 12 years there I moved to a 100 member law firm, but found co-managing 19 tax lawyers a more daunting task than I wanted. Moved then to join my practice with my wife (soon to be married 23 years), Anne Reilly Moses, in the firm of Moses & Moses PC (www.mosespc.com) where we have happily practiced together now for over 5 years. We have one daughter, age 20 attending NYU as a Sophomore, Anne has a son, age 31, in advertising in New York, and I have two sons, age 35 (Major Charles (Jeff) Moses, USMC, Commanding Officer, VMGR-352 DET A, 3d MAW
FWD stationed in Iraq) and age 33 (a police officer in Birmingham). My sons are married and
have respectively 2 daughters and 1 daughter (with one on the way).
Anne and I look forward to meeting up with this group and learning what
the corps contributed to your lives.
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Dennis M. Murphy

Presently retired since 1998, living in Delaware. Volunteer Firefighter, EMT, member USCG Auxiliary and Knights of Columbus 3rd & 4th Degree.

Two sons: Tom - Married, two children & a USN Commander, commands Unit One Dive & Salvage out of Pearl Harbor. He is also a parachutist (86 jumps) and an EOD.

Mike - Maritime Chemical Broker for Nordic Tankers in Stamford, Connecticut.
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Harry T. Neill
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Larry G. Nelson
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John F. Newhard, Jr
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William R. Nicholson III
I was so pleased when my friend (and only connection from my Marine Corps. days) Robb Mitchell told me that he had been contacted by Bill Franklin last year to participate in our TBS Reunion. I have enjoyed looking over the roster and reading about what has gone on in your lives since we last visited some 40 years ago.

I live primarily in Florida, but have a small second home in Western Pennsylvania, which I enjoy with my wife, Allison, and my two younger children. My two older children are off on their own…one has three children – my grandchildren. In addition to enjoying my family, I have been active in short triathlons for the last fifteen years and, generally, have been blessed with good health and spirit.

More than you probably want to know about what I have been up to, in terms of business, is on my web link (http://www.wrnfinancial.com/). I am really looking forward to seeing as many of you as are able to show up in June.

Your friend, classmate and fellow Marine,

Bill
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Luke Novelli, Jr.
Luke Novelli is Senior Enterprise Associate in Research and Innovation at the Center for Creative Leadership (CCL), an international provider of executive education. His research focus is effective leadership development processes globally and characteristics of organisational contexts that provide support for leadership development initiatives. Most recently, Dr Novelli was Asia Director, Custom Solutions and Applied Research, based in Singapore. He was responsible for the design and management of US$1 million of custom solutions work in the Asian region and adapting CCL work to the local cultural context. He has taught at Bocconi University (Italy), Wake Forest University, University of North Carolina and Gonzaga University in the US.
Dr Novelli has published extensively, including articles that have appeared in journals such as Social Justice, Trends in Organizational Behavior, Journal of International Management, Journal of Management Inquiry, Journal of Health and Human Resource Administration, Organizational Behavior Teaching Journal, Journal of Management Consulting, Journal of Occupational Behavior and Academy of Management Journal. He has also presented at various international conferences and seminars. He has a PhD in Organizational Behavior from the University of Southern California and an MBA from San Diego State University.
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John D.Pallo
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Allen J. Parapot
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Travis W. Patterson
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Jimmy C. Peddy
Ft. Sill Arty school April - June, 69
C/1/12 in Nam JUL - SEP 69; FO attached to L/3/3
3rd Marines deployed out of country in Oct, so I was reassigned to 1st 175mm Guns as FDO, Hill 34, and as CO NAC Detachment.
July 70 rotated back stateside to Camp LeJeune, NC, 2d MARDIV, with duty as Statistics Officer in G-1
Released Active Duty July or Aug 71.

Free and single in Texas until May 75. Married Linda in Dallas. Currently have 2 Aggie daughters, 28 & 26. The 28 yr.old is getting married in Mar08. Haven't found anyone good enough for the 26 yr old, yet.

I have worked as a real estate broker for the past 23 years at Warehouse Properties in Dallas. I do Tenant/Owner Rep for sales & leasing & property management, or wherever else I can make a $.

I'm looking forward to reconnecting with a bunch of heroes, in my opinion! See y'all in June.
Jimmy was promoted to Capt. at the Reunion
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Ranson J. Pelt, Jr.
I went through Parris Island in 1967 (Platoon 1085), and went to Vietnam as a PFC in '68. I ended up in K 3/26. After being medevaced to the States from a gunshot, I went through the 52nd Special OCS class in July '68. This class was made up of 90% former enlisted.
Next, I went through the Basic School at Quantico (D Company, Class 4-69). Assigned an infantry MOS, I spent 4 months with the 28th Marines at Pendleton. There, I was a platoon commander with E Company (the unit that raised the flag on IWO). I had a slot to go through the AO school at mainside Pendleton flying back seat in OV-10's, but I lost it when I got orders back to WesPac. I returned to Vietnam in August '69, and was a platoon commander with India Company until I was medevaced (shrapnel) in November.
I spent 6 weeks in Yokosuka, Japan, and when I returned in December, G-2 tried to talk me into going to a CAAP unit in Quang Tri Province. I politely declined, and asked to go back to 3/5. By this time I was a 1/Lt and was assigned to Mike Co. as XO.
I talked Lt. Clair into letting me have 3rd Platoon when the platoon commander slot opened up. (Still got stuck with the XO duties.) When Lt. Lewis left in July '70, I took over as CO. The first day I took over, Mike 2 got several NVA kills on Charlie Ridge. (Way to go Mike 2!) I don't think Ted Lewis ever forgave me for that. :-) Since I was due to rotate home in early September, I was replaced by Capt. Hill on Aug. 25, and I stayed with the company in the field breaking in the new skipper. When he was medevaced on Aug. 27, I again assumed command of Mike until September 7. I then rotated home late, but it was worth it.
I spent the next year as the CO of a training company at ITR, Camp Lejeune. I made captain about a month before I got off active duty. I stayed in the reserves about 3 years in a Motor T maintenance unit, but those guys weren't grunts.
Today, I work at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, VA as the director of fiscal operations for information systems.
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James W. Pennington
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Eldon R. Perkins
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George J. Platter
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Terrell B. Porter
Cpl. Terry Porter
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Darrell E. Pound (Skip)
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John E. Ready
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John E. Rice
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Jerald J. Rinder
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Sands A. Robnick
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Humberto W. Rodriguez
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Thomas H. Rouse
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Randall W. Rueb

Since anyone has seen me, I have been on and off of active duty until the USMC figured me out and made me retire in 1998. My major Marine Corps accomplishments include: CO, 5th 8” Howitzer Battery, USMCR (1979-1980); Head, Intelligence Training and Management Branch, HQMC (1988-89 & 1991); and on the staff of SECNAV (1995-1997). In my convoluted civilian career I have held financial management and executive positions in the transportation industry, ostly oil field and heavy equipment transportation, and the chief financial officer of a publically traded company. In 2003-04, I was the principal advisor for surface transportation to the Iraqi Minister of Transportation. These days I have a couple of clients in the mobile medical services and real estate businesses. My wife of 33 wonderful years, Margaret, and I have one son, Rich, who begins medical school this fall.
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John H. Rutherford

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Darrell L. Sayer
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Marshall J. Schroeder
2007 in Iraq with State Department working on banking 2005-6 professor USC in Viet Nam teaching banking to prepare them for entry into WTO 2004 US Treasury in Iraq to evaluate banks 2001-2003 Financial consultant to Bear Sterns, Merrill Lynch, Goldman Sacks 2000 Hovercraft de Costa Rica in Costa Rica 1995-1999 Financial consultant Greenwich Capital, Nomura, Lehman Bros 1993-94 Professor Moscow University, Moscow Russia 1992 Missionary in Central America placing loans and grants to build schools, houses, churches 1990-91 Comptroller of Currency, National Bank Examiner syndicated credits
My current address is Marshall Schroeder, PRT Babil, USMI - Sc?REO Al Hillah, APO AE 09316 I am US State Department, Sr. Banking Advisor, Al Hillah Regional Embassy Iraq you can all me at phone 240-553-0670 x 4213 That is located about 60 miles south of Baghdad and is a reinforced base with about 1000 Army, Marines, Triple Canopy, Blackwater security forces. My USA address is the Sloop Miniver, Flag Harbor, St. Lawrence, Maryland. When I get back from Iraq I will be sailing her to the Caribbean for a years crusing. I will most likely be in Egypt when the reunion is held but sure would like to be there.
Giving presentation to State Bank of Vietnam as Professor of U. S. Calif at Santa Ana in Hanoi
In Shearton in Saigon
At one of the hill positions I defended in Kilo 3/26 in Elephant Valley NW of Da Nang
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 James G. Shaw
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Dennis F. Shanahan
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Landis W. Shuler
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Michael R. Simonson
Mike and Maggie live in Cooper City, a suburb of Fort Lauderdale, FL. Mike is a professor of Instructional Technology and Distance Education at Nova Southeastern University (NSU) in North Miami Beach, Florida, and Maggie is a middle school media specialist at Highland Park school in Miami-Dade county. After the Marine Corps, Mike finished his Ph.D. at the University of Iowa and was a professor at Iowa State University for 25 years before moving to NSU in 1998. Maggie was a library/media specialist in Mason City, Iowa before moving to Florida.
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Curran D. Smith
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Theodore F. Smyer
Enlisted in USMC at age 19, June 67, attended 52nd Special OCS , and TBS class 4/69. Married in March 1969. Assigned as plt leader in G 2/9 in April, 1969. Completed overseas tour and assigned to Staging Bn, Camp Pendleton until early release to attend college. Graduated from Univ of Arkansas on the GI Bill, and accepted active duty Navy scholarship to attend medical school, graduating in 1978. Completed a family practice internship and then served in multiple billets as general medical officer. 3 years in Western Australia, 2 years in Idaho Falls, Id, 2 years in Guam, 2 years at San Diego. I had the honor of serving as Senior Medical Officer at MCRD San Diego 20 years after I graduated from bootcamp there. I then completed a residency in Emergency Medicine and was assigned to the ER at 29 Palms before I retired in 1993.
Moved to Great Falls, Montana and practiced Emergency Medicine for 5 years, before settling in Brookings, South Dakota and practicing part time in Sioux Falls. I have a 56 acre hobby farm, raise sheep and labrador dogs, and commute to Las Vegas where my wife works as the Associate Dean of the Nursing School at UNLV. We have 3 daughters, and 4 grandchildren.
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Hugh B. Speed III
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John N. Staples III
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Floyd H. Stowe II
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Fredric J. Swango
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Dennis M. Taylor
Denny and Joan Taylor at the 40th Reunion
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 Dan Mike Tennent
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John R. Todd
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Dick A. Tracy
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John W. Truitt
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John W. Vagnetti
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Eddie L Vaughan
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Richard W. Vaughn
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Tilmon Preston Vice
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Frank E. Walter
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Myron Wasiuta
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Joseph M. Welborn
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Robert P. Whitehill
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Truett.K. Whitmire II
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James L. Whiteside
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John R. Williams
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Ronald E. Woernle
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Jack M. Woynowski
A brief life overview for Jack Woynowski
I was born in Kassel, Germany, 26 Mar 48, and with my father and three sisters, emigrated to the US in Feb 49, arriving in New Orleans (Ellis Island was backed-up) and ending up in Chicago. While in HS, I ran track & cross-country, doing well enough in sports and academics to earn my scholarship to DePaul Univ. Learned SCUBA in Lake Michigan. Playing more pinochle than attending classes, I took the civil service exam for the Post Office, and actually worked delivering mail (in the f…….g snow and cold), digging my car out of the snow regularly, and really not liking it. I knew my free days were numbered, so I decided to trick Uncle Sugar, and enlisted in the Marines instead of being drafted. That’ll teach ‘em, I thought.
That first Sunday, in the dark balcony of the MCRD San Diego base theatre for church call, was the first time I cried, thinking what the h..l did I get myself into? Fast forward. Graduated company honorman, PFC, dress blues from Leatherneck Magazine, and ITR. NAS Memphis for aviation electronics, there long enough to become a Corporal and get a car. Great duty.
Heard that officers made more money, so I applied for OCS. 52nd Special OCS class. John Korneder was my bunky. My dad (an Artillery Officer in the Polish Army and POW during the war) and brother-in-law (Army Captain) pinned my bars. After commissioning, beautiful TBS. Weekend trips to Mary Washington College-Fredericksburg (TBS Annex), nearby motels, and excursions to DC were out-f……g standing. Managed to graduate, then to Montford Point for Supply/Warehouse Officer School, where I made 21. Assigned to Force Logistic Command-Red Beach, RVN as Asst. S-3, where I set up helo and truck resupply runs to Hill 55, An Hoa, Chu Lai, Hoi An, Dong Ha, Quangtri and other places I can’t remember, and being the NFG, pay officer to those places as well. Many thousands of funny money scrip entrusted to a brown bar. Amazing. But upon getting my silver bars, I was sent to LZ Baldy/7th Marines, to run the ammo, POL, & rations dumps. Lucky I had great NCOs, but there were some exciting moments.
Went to Australia for R&R, and met up with an extremely skinny John Vagnetti (He blamed it on being an FO with the grunts). He must have put on 50 pounds in the week we were there, eating constantly, in between the dates the lady from the Sydney USO set us up with. Went diving in Bondi Bay and helped salvage a small boat.
Got orders to PISC, and wound up being the Base Storage Officer and the S-4 for the WM battalion. My bosses were all first rate lady Marines. Alright, no snickers, but I was the only one with a sword during parades.
28 Jun 71, left active duty, bought a house in Cocoa, FL, got my job back with the Post Office, went back to college (GI Bill) at night and the reserves with 4th Anglico in West Palm, FL. Went to jump school at Ft. Benning and Naval Gunfire/Forward Air Control in Little Creek, where I met Marnie at the O-Club. Got married to her 23 June 73, and got an Ocean Engineering degree in 1974. We moved temporarily to Houston, where I attended a commercial diving school (GI Bill again). Got hired by, at the time, the premier diving companies on the Gulf Coast and New Orleans, Taylor Diving first and then Sub Sea. Did saturation diving in the North Sea, deep air diving in the Persian Gulf, deep mixed gas in the North Atlantic, and steady offshore work in the Gulf of Mexico: until the oil business stalled in the early 80’s. Managed to parlay my high pressure gas experience into becoming a Hydrostatic Test Engineer for a power company that was in the process of building a nuclear power plant near New Orleans. Worked at Waterford 3 for the last 27 years. In 1999, I got stupid and Marnie and I divorced.
Hurricane Katrina (29 Aug 05) exposed the failures of the Corps of Engineers, in their design and oversight of the contractors and inspectors for the levee/floodwall system for New Orleans and my first floor was totally destroyed after being flooded for 2 weeks.
I’m rebuilding, and plan to have a house-warming shrimp/crawfish boil at the end of March 08, only 30 months later.
Call me at 504 296-6564 if you want to help with sheetrock, flooring or painting, or if you just want to visit my NOLA. You missed Mardi Gras, but you can still make the French Quarter Festival (April 11-13, 2008). Jazzfest is the last weekend in April and the first weekend in May. All y’all are welcome.
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Anthony H. Yusi
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Stephen A. Zrenda
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Associated with Basic Class 4-69
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Virgil E. Bleill
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Frank L. Brewer
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Frederick R. Edgerton
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Thurston Estes
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Robert J. Howey
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James M. Kamman
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Max G. McCoy
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Robert D. Millberry
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Warren C. Spiller
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BASIC CLASS 4-69 STAFF OFFICERS



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Richard Gunselman is a native of Nashville, TN, and a graduate of Lipscomb High School. He then earned a B. S. in Physical Education from Lipscomb University before becoming a 2nd Lieutenant in the U. S. Marine Corps. After serving in Vietnam, he was stationed at Quantico, when he met his wife, Sharon. After they were married, they left Quantico for Syracuse, NY, where Megan was born, then to Camp Lejeune, NC. At the point Richard retired from the Marines. He earned an M. Ed. in Recreation from Memphis State Univeristy, then they moved to Texas A & M in College Station, TX, where he earned a Ph. D. in Recreation and Resource Development. Sharon used the opportunity to complete undergraduate work and was awarded a B. S. in Food Technology, the science of food preparation, development of new products, and inspections. They moved next to Shepherdstown, WV, where Richard developed the Park Administration curriculum. He also served on the Board of Directors for Camp WaMaVa. Sharon earned an M. S. in Home Economics from Hood College, Frederick, MD. The next assignment was in Hampton, VA, and then to Europe. Their son Jeffrey was born while
they were in Germany. He now resides in Lubbock, with his Black Lab Thomas. Both Richard and Sharon pursued careers in Civil Service, and their combined careers have resulted in
27 moves, including Germany; Belgium; Wichita Falls, TX; Valdosta, GA; Okinawa, Japan; Osan, Korea; San Angelo, TX (where Richard retired); Abilene, TX; Clovis, NM; McGuire AFB, NJ; back to Okinawa and now back to Falls Church, VA. Sharon now works in the Pentagon as a Policy and Resource Analyst for the Secretary of the Air Force in the Wounded Warrior
Care Program. Richard likes target shooting and fishing. Sharon loves art, doing mostly landscapes, primarily in acrylics but sometimes in pencil. She also enjoys needlework, with Belgian lace a favorite. One of her jobs was as a seamstress for National Park Service at Harper’s Ferry. There she helped make the clothing for the living history program and she worked in the original tailor shop.

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We are looking for the following Marines who have not been found. If anyone has infromation about any of the people listed below, please contact Bill Franklin at 407-325-5182 or billf1224@gmail.com .
FOLLOWING ARE MISSING
Julio N. Abanto
Richard A. Allan
Michael S. Baker
David J. Bays
David C. Bell
Willis R. Bierly, Jr.
Lee F. Borchert
Alfred T. Branca
Thomas F. Brunk
Thomas R. Casey II
L. E. Cimaglia
William A. Clark III
Dwane D. Clodfelter
Bruce J. Cohen
Allan E. Davies
Gerald D. Dziejma
Robert E. Fine
John R. Fornes
Richard H. Green
William A. Green, Jr.
W. E. Hard
Jerry B. Hatfield
James D. Hayes
Jerold L. Hewitt
Daniel J. Kelly
Nathan S. Kugler
Charles R. Lane
Simeon R. Lee III
Bruce W. Loftin
Duane D. Loncosky
John W. MacArthur
Joseph D. Machtel
Timothy G. Margetson
Joseph C. McAndrew
John R. Mitchell
Mitchell J. Paige
Thomas L. Parrish
Allen J. Parrott, Jr.
Alan E. Pelhan
William R. Perrin
John F. Rhodes, Jr.
Steven L. Richards
Douglas Q. Rosenow
David W. Rowlands
Walter E. Schultz
Irving E. Shafer
John A. Sims
Patrick L. Smith
Richard P. Smith
Walter H. Smith, Jr.
William A. Smith
Elmer R. Spears, Jr.
William F. Stacey II
Peter J. Tharp
Donald R. Thompson
William H. Topping
Robert B. Thornton
George C. Tullos
David E. Vester
Richard L. Young
R.G. Nelson
Charles C. Kessler
William E. Fahey
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This site can be a place to post pictures, personnel biographies, war stories and news for the members of Basic Class 4-69 and their families. Please send photos and biographies and anything else you would like to contribute to this site to: billf1224@gmail.com . OR call me at 407-325-5182